GE GAS STOVE

We purchased a gas stove for our new home a year ago October. We didn't use it till we moved in September. The store we bought it from was supposed to prepare it propane. We didn't know it hadn't been done and ended up with an oven full of soot. I called the store and they sent someone out to fix the problem. They also replaced a regulator that was faulty.
It's still filling my oven with soot and staining my outside with it.
Any ideas what the problem could be?
MoM
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This is Turtle.
a stove set to run on Natural gas normally as you woulf buy it in the stores. they have to convert it to Propane to let it run on Propane. So what happen was you fired it up using propane with Natural Gas jets which will make it put out too much fuel and not enough of intake air to match . Then you get soot everywhere.
Stove are set up to be run on Propane or natural gas but you have to set the equipent up to do it on the right fuel your using.
TURTLE
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TURTLE wrote:

Stove as well as gas BBQ too. Tony
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install it for propane. They didn't. We converted the burners and tried to convert the oven but it still didn't work. They sent out a service man who replaced the regulator and adjusted the flame and it's still putting out soot. Now I'm waiting again for the service man to come again on the 20th.
MoM
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this is Turtle.
take me as a a horses butt , but i would bring it back to them to get me another one from some one else that does not let me do without a stove for 2 weeks.
There is the limit to bull and your being sent to it here.
TURTLE
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MoM wrote:

how to convert (replace) the jets, (as Turtle indicated). The little jets are included in a little clip underneath the oven. The regulator needs to be "converted" by removing a nut and changing the position of a little pin. The air intake shutter needs to be adjusted. The level of the "simmer" position of the burners needs to be adjusted. Do you think the kids from the store went thru all these procedures? Can you see that the oven burner has the proper blue flame with no significant yellow tips? -=Art=-
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MoM, depending on your stove model, there may or may not be an air shutter to adjust as Art said but there is nearly always a regulator change and an orifice ("jet") change to be made. The properties of propane are much different than natural gas: propane is denser and has a higher energy content than natural gas per volume. That means propane is delivered to the stove at a higher pressure and squirted through a smaller hole (the orifice/jet). The regulator change fixes the pressure, the replacement orifice changes the hole. Chances are, your regulator was not "faulty" but never was properly converted to propane use. It sounds as if you still don't have the right orifice - too big a hole means too much gas being delivered (a "rich" fuel/air mixture) and would account for your soot. Tell your store they need to come out and finish the job. It's tough to say if you should trust them, though - they sound seriously incompetent.
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I don't think they repaired the problem. The just assumed it was the regulator and replaced that. I had a similar probelm and the repairman did the exact same thing. He ordered new parts rather than figure out whas was wrong. Turned out my probelm was a small amount of wax from the assembly process had worked its way into a jet and partialy blocked it. I don't think this is your probelm. My suspicion is that the regulator was perfectly fine. You might want to go to the GE web site and download the installation manual for your model range. It shows exactly what needs to be done to convert from gas to propane. I had to replace the four stove top burner jets and reverse a small part that regulates gas flow in the regulator. The second step can easily be overlooked or done wrong as it is a very small part that goes one direction for natural gas and the other way for propane. The only other thing I can think it would be is the little sleve that regulates the amount of air getting to the flame. Another simple adjustment but it can cause problems if it isn't set correctly. The sleve is rotated by loosening a screw and turning it one way or the other. There are measured settings in the manual or you can adjust it by watching the flame if you know what to look for.
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This is Turtle.
You said the gas regulater might be just fine might be true but when a service man is told there was sooting up of the gas appliance. he will change the regulator right off the bat for insurance reasons. then also G/E does not pay service calls for appliances that was suppose to be converted before it was sold. he had to call something bad to justify the service call.
TURTLE
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