galvanized pipe for gas

Saw the black pipe for water question, how about the other way around?
My house has some galvanized pipe used for gas. Have had some opinions that the gas would corrode this pipe and only black is appropriate. The city indicated that using galvanized for gas was not a code violation though.
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Ken wrote:

Check Out http://www.keidel.com/mech/pvf/pipe-galvanized.htm
Hope this helps, William
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snipped-for-privacy@wdeans.com ( snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com) said...

An interesting article, but here is a question I've been thinking of:
Which is better for compressed air?
I would like to run a permanent line from a location where I would like to run the compressor (for noise reasons) to another room for use.
Years ago, I used to work in a plastics molding plant and I seem to recall that galvanized pipe was used for the compressed air lines, but I thought I would throw the question out here to see what opinions there are.
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For what ever it's worth, I have never seen galvanized pipe for air in a commercial/industrial application. Not saying it does not exist, but plain black pipe is more common. I see no reason why you can not use either. Today's galvanized pipe is much cleaner than years ago so flaking should not be a concern. Greg
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I was always told that black iron pipe joints are "tighter" because the threads grind into one another and that this doesn't happen in galvanized pipe. Black iron was supposed to be "softer" whatever that means. As I said, this is what I heard. I really never believed/understood it..
Greg O wrote:

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Sounds like BS to me. When you cut threads on galvanized pipe it cuts off the galvanized coating, leaving bare metal, same as black pipe. Greg
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Really? My understanding is galvanized is nothing more than plated black pipe. Greg
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Weigh em.... You will find the iron black will weigh much more..LOL
Of course, I dont mess with it much anymore...still got my threaders and all that good stuff, but now, stainless is the way to go..we recently did a 3 story instituion, 5 units, and had all the gas piping RAN, in under 4 hours..two guys. Thats secured, ran, and all we had to do was put fittings on each end, and connect. I like that stuff....black pipe, ran the same way, would have taken about 3 days for two men to do.
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We don't do much rigid pipe any more either. The last couple large commercial jobs we did all the NG in copper pipe using ProPress. We do some boiler work so the ProPress comes in handy for that, then they came out with fittings for gas, and the local inspector says if it is listed, go for it! It is about even cost wise, but much faster.
http://www.ridgid.com/propresssystem /
We do a fair amount of SST, but on industrial, heavy commercial work the inspector will not allow it. Greg
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Why wont your inspector allow it? Its certified in all lower 48 for use in commercial work. IF you want, ill pop you a mail with the local regional reps name, and he will check into it, or put you in touch with someone that will, and get you a definitive answer why.
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We can use SST in commercial situations, office buildings, small warehouses, that type of thing but not in a heavy equipment repair shop for example. No big deal, we just use what we can, and bill accordingly! Greg
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Ken wrote:

Greetings,
Galvanized steel anything only implies a protective (zinc) coating over the steel. Regardless of what the gas does to the coating, if anything, I do not see why it should continue to eat away at the steel after making its way through the coating? However, I have heard that the zinc may cause a clog as it does corrode. I have experienced clogged natural gas lines in the past so I know that this is not a theoretical concern.
Hope this helps, William
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Years ago the stink additive reacted badly with galvanized pipe, so it was forbidden for gas. However, so many people used galvanized anyhow that the utilities changed their formulation so that galvanized was okay. Around here anyhow. Check with your gas supplier and confirm it is okay with them. Who cares if the town allows it if it will damage your furnace?
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"Ken" <zab1116_at_yahoo.com> wrote in message

I would not worry about it. Our city follows International Mechanical Code. I wish I had my code book handy so I could cite right out of the codes, but the IMC requires gas pipe installed outdoors to be painted or to use galvanized pipe. We have piped many large commercial jobs with galvanized pipe, some jobs are hundreds of feet of pipe. Now granted, you are indoors, but still it is no problem. Greg
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This is turtle
Have Water or Gas in Black pipe or Galvanized pipe makes no difference but where you put the pipe does.
TURTLE
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Call me chickens#!t, but I kinda thought the black pipe was softer, and wouldn't spark nearly as easily, not that I remember ever seeing galvanized spark. But someone will still try to attach a grounding wire to it! Tom
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[You're joking, right?]
SOFTER ???????
This ain't your dick we're talking about <LOL> (which is a completely different kind of pipe)
They're both the same pipe, it's just the coating. Zinc or black (stuff).that differs.
(What is that black coating anyhow? Is it paint or what????)
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This is Turtle.
Tom , They figured out what why the pipe weas sparking and it was not being grounded by using teflon tape and not liquid teflon. The teflon tape would not let the two pipes touch each other to comp-lete the grounds. teflon tape is banded in moset refinerry plants in the oil field. coating is the difference in the two pipes also.
TURTLE
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On Wed, 16 Nov 2005 20:30:50 -0600, "Ken" <zab1116_at_yahoo.com> wrote:

....... Why dont you two guys just trade pipes .....
I believe that natural gas used to corrode zink and thus clog orfices. I think that has been corrected. Propane can use any steel or copper pipe.
The main reason for black pipe on gas is for easy identification. A can of black spray paint wont hurt anything and keeps black pipes from rusting in damp areas too.
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