Furnace recommendations

I am in need of a new furnace for a rental property. The property is a small cape, and the size of the furnace needed is 85K BTU, and it uses oil.
I'm told by friends that the brand of furnace is less important than the burner, and that as long as it has a Beckett burner all will be well.
Can anyone recommend a good furnace with no frills, a Beckett burner, and an efficiency rating around 85% that a non-licensed consumer can purchase at a discount warehouse. Thanks...
---- Posted via Pronews.com - Premium Corporate Usenet News Provider ---- http://www.pronews.com offers corporate packages that have access to 100,000+ newsgroups
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
This review site recommends Thermo Pride OH Series. http://www.consumersearch.com/www/house_and_home/furnaces/index.html

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
layman wrote:

Both of the furnaces in my home are Thermopride (forced hot air) with Beckett oil burners. My water heaters also use Beckett oil burners and I've had no problem with any of them. The Honeywell controllers are another story though.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
-snip-

I'm not the OP- but I'm sort of looking for a furnace. Since you're the second one to say Thermopride, I had to go look. I haven't looked at furnaces for 30 yrs- so I was impressed with the idea of a 2-stage. Then I look at the specs and they confused me. http://www.thermopride.com/OH6_2Stage.cfm#spec
At " low capacity" it has 'low fire' and 'high fire' at 70k & 85k BTU- and at 'high capacity' it has 'low fire' and 'high fire' at 85k & 106k BTU.
Is the low/high capacity different set-ups [just a nozzle & adjustment?] - or does it output all those different BTUs from the factory?
Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jim Elbrecht wrote:

I don't know but suspect that these are accomplished by changing the nozzle. Two-stage furnaces today make a lot of sense.
My furnaces are both 175K BTU/hr units and I run them only at the high fire level with fairly high air flow rates so that the output air is maintained at 140 F.
These furnaces were installed 15 years ago and have been trouble free. The initial problems that I had were due to an installer and engineer who made numerous mistakes designing the multi-zone control system.
Boden
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
lanman wrote:

Utica boilers. Beckett is not the only burner maker others are just as good like Wayne, Miller.
Monitor heaters are nice too. Propane furnaces are nice and quiet.
--
Blattus Slafaly ? 3 :) 7/8

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 31 Mar 2008 23:14:38 -0400, Blattus Slafaly 0/00 ? ? ?

From the conversations I've had thus far with people in the HVAC business, Beckett is a favorite with many. Why? Simplicity, durability, ease of maintenance, and availability of parts. Since I need a furnace for a rental property, and since durability and easy maintenance are the most important criteria for me, Beckett is currently at the top of my list until someone convinces me of something better.
---- Posted via Pronews.com - Premium Corporate Usenet News Provider ---- http://www.pronews.com offers corporate packages that have access to 100,000+ newsgroups
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Just so you dont confuse yourself keep this in mind. There is not ONE oil furnace out there that is "easy" to maintain. This is due mainly in part that the average homeowner CANNOT set up an oil burner without somewhat expensive digital combustion analyzing equipment including a smoke pump and draft gauge. You cannot "look" at the flame anymore and try to adjust it NOR just take a guess at where you think that flappy damper thingy belongs. You can cost yourself or the person paying for the oil hundreds of extra dollars in wasted fuel. Bubba

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I will suggest you are trying to make the wrong decision. The decision you should be making is the contractor who will put it in.
First the contractor should consider the sizing and not relay on what is there. They also should be able to consider local conditions and help you choose a brand and model that will fit your needs far better than we can. If you have a good tech, they will chose good equipment.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia \'s Muire duit
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 1 Apr 2008 09:29:13 -0400, "Joseph Meehan"

While this may be good advice, it's slanted towards what's best for the installer, not the customer. "Trust me" is hard to do with so many unscrupulous contractors running loose. Even an honest contractor may select something with a higher profit margin or minimum features allowing for easier maintenance. I'd prefer to educate myself on what's available, solicit advice from disinterested parties, and make an informed decision.
---- Posted via Pronews.com - Premium Corporate Usenet News Provider ---- http://www.pronews.com offers corporate packages that have access to 100,000+ newsgroups
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

...
That is true enough. I certainly did not emprise the importance of your choice of contractors. It is the most important choice and critical for the job. Asking neighbors, friends, co-workers and family members is a good first step.
Keep in mind that the cheapest bid is not likely to be the best or cheapest in the long run, but it could be.
--
Joseph Meehan

Dia \'s Muire duit
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

A regular furnace will be near a max of 83% not 85% efficient,, a condensing unit will be 92-96%, it will allow you to raise rents Quicker. Tenants move if not happy. .
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Tue, 1 Apr 2008 16:42:38 -0700 (PDT), ransley

----http://www.pronews.comoffers corporate packages that have access to 100,000+ newsgroups

That's a good point. All things being equal, what is the cost difference in the monthly bill for an 83% efficient furnace vs. a 92% efficient furnace? ---- Posted via Pronews.com - Premium Corporate Usenet News Provider ---- http://www.pronews.com offers corporate packages that have access to 100,000+ newsgroups
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
-snip-

I'm probably missing a step- but roughly 9%.
Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

LOL.
Is it really that straightforward, e.g., a $100 bill would be $91 with the better furnace?
---- Posted via Pronews.com - Premium Corporate Usenet News Provider ---- http://www.pronews.com offers corporate packages that have access to 100,000+ newsgroups
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
lanman wrote:

Hmmm, Ultra high efficiency furnace tends to give more trouble. If you want it, get an extra warranty coverage specially for variable speed ECM DC motor. Saving is for the LONG term living there for long time.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

re: Is it really that straightforward, e.g., a $100 bill would be $91 with the better furnace?
You have to consider TCO - Total Cost of Ownership.
Even if it was as easy as $91 vs $100, if you paid more for the higher efficiency furnace, you have to factor in your payback period at, let's say, $9 a month. The service calls and parts might be more expensive also, so you need to look into the MTBF - Mean Time Between Failure - numbers and average repair costs. In many cases, the more complex a unit is, the higher the cost to maintain (or repair) it.
Since it's a rental, you have some other things to consider...
If the tenants pay for the heat, then you'll never see the payback for the more efficient furnace, but you will be responsible for the (possibly) higher upfront and on-going maintenance costs.
Just some things to factor in...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.