furnace question-condensation

About 4 months ago, I came home to a partially flooded basement close to where our furnace stands. When I investigated, I found that the drain in the floor nearest to where the furnace condensation pipe leads in was completely backed up. After sticking a wire down in there, it finally released most of the backup. My question: is water supposed to remain in this floor drain or should all the water be drained out? I still have a little bit of water sitting in there at all times and didn't know if this was normal. If water is not supposed to be in this drain, how do I clean it out?
Can I also use this same drain for draining my hot water heater as well? Thanks in advance.
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You're probably looking at an in-floor connection to the local water-table, rather than what you seem to perceive as a piped drain. Often it's just tile pipe to nowhere.
I've seen strange things happen with water level in such "hole-in-the-floor." Like, after decades of a dry-hole, suddenly water poured forth. Seems something changed subsurface water situation in the area of the house. Then it flooded another half-dozen times.
Simplest solution: float-valved sump-pump. Severe case: work on drainage around house perimeter.
J
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If it is a sewer connection it should have an s-bend or some sort to keep a water lock to prevent sewer gas from entering the basement.
The ones I have seen have a removable grate cover to prevent debris from entering.
If it an old pot style drain it may be less than 12" deep but will have a pipe entering the side near the bottom.
You can use it for draining anything in the area but code may require an air gap.
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