Frozen Doors?

We are getting alot of rain then freezing temperatures.
The doors on the house are sticking some and the doors and power windows in the car are freezing shut.
Any ideas to ease the house doors, they are new this year and I don't want to remove the weather stripping as someone suggested.
--
CathyLee
Nova Scotia
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For the car they make this stuff you can spray into your lock. My latch mechanism also froze up, this is the thing that you see on the "edge" of the door when you open it. I hit that with WD40 and it's fine now.
Nova Scotia, wow. How cold does it get there ? Are you influenced by the maritime currents or is it just cold cold ?
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How does that help when the weatherstripping is frozen to the door? A better suggestion is to prevent the freezing by spraying the strip with silicone before the rains and freezing come. In that type of weather, I don't lock the doors, nor do I use the emergency brake. Then again, I never lock the doors anyway as it prevents damage from amateur thieves.
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wrote in message

Doors freeeze when moisture on both weatherstripping and door-frame turn to ice. Oil repels moisture, thus reduces the amount of moisture available to freeze doors shut. Food oils e.g. Pam work just as well.
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Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
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Don Phillipson wrote:

Also a good product for that use.
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Joseph Meehan

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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

I suggest that people be careful about what they spray into a lock. Oil based products like WD-40 and some of the frozen lock products (which also contain oil) will allow the lock to work better for a while, only to cause it to gum up and fail later.
There are products designed for freeing up frozen locks and don't contain any products what will cause problems later.
WD-40 should never be used on a lock (at least the part of the lock were you use the key. It can be used for other parts.

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Joseph Meehan

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I'm afraid I have to respectfully disagree:
wrote: : > For the car they make this stuff you can spray into your lock. : > My : > latch mechanism also froze up, this is the thing that you see on the : > "edge" of the door when you open it. I hit that with WD40 and it's : > fine now. : : : I suggest that people be careful about what they spray into a lock. Oil : based products like WD-40 and some of the frozen lock products (which also : contain oil) will allow the lock to work better for a while, only to cause : it to gum up and fail later. Umm, no, that's not true; WD40 actually evaporates away, even in sub zero temperatures. It will also quickly displace any moisture it comes in contact with and prevent further freezing if it's used correctly. Until the moisture returns, that is. There is nothing, nada, zip, that leaves a film of any kind, that will NOT collect debris and "gum up" as you say. The best working lock is one that is dry and hasn't been mistreated with oils or salt water,etc, allowing rust etc. to form, or where car washes have forced water into the lock, past the protective cover. : : There are products designed for freeing up frozen locks and don't : contain any products what will cause problems later. True. But they're only useful AFTER the lock is frozen, and if you happen to have access to it in the parking lot where you discover your frozen locks. : : WD-40 should never be used on a lock (at least the part of the lock were : you use the key. It can be used for other parts. Wrong. It's excellent for displacing water where freezing occurs, and keeping the locks workable. I've used it now for about 40 years on any and every car I own/owned, as part of the winter maintenance schedule on everything from hinges to my door locks. The only real caveat with WD40 is that it's NOT really a lubricant; it has poor lubricating properties. I suggest you read the can if we're really discussing THE WD-40 formula product. Beofre someone says I never see whether it collects, gums up, etc., yes, I do, because I also use it on hood and trunk latches, door latches, etc. etc. etc., areas that do not require lubrication as a rule. To lubridate such areas, I use silicone or lithium lubricants, as appropriate. In my experience it's more likely for the seals & rubbers to collect moisture in the dust they collect and freeze something shut than the door locks freeze. The only freezing I've never been able to overcome cleanly is the windows freezing shut; some of our roads are very, very dusty. : : > : > Nova Scotia, wow. How cold does it get there ? Are you influenced by : > the maritime currents or is it just cold cold ? : : -- : Joseph Meehan : : Dia duit : :
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Pop wrote:

The problem is not all of it will evaporate. There are enough heavier oils in there that don't rapidly evaporate to cause problems in locks but attracting dirt. I have seen plenty of locks "fixed" with that stuff to know.

That part is true and is, of course what the "WD" stands for.

True.

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Joseph Meehan

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It was Sunny and +8 (46F) yesterday we were playing in the sand box and -7 (19F) and windy today feels like -16C (3F) Shes forzen solid today:>)
I use the autolocks on the car...or dont lock it at all :)
I need something to go on the rubber trim of the car doors, when it rains they freeze solid.
CathyLee

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If you don't have one, get some type of overhang to keep the water off the doors. For the car windows, don't try to use them when they are frozen. You could burn out the motor.

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CathyLee wrote:

Find a can of a spray dry silicone lube and use that. It will leave a dry white powder that will keep the ice from sticking.
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Joseph Meehan

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CathyLee wrote:

You can't stop it completely. First, clean the weather stripping, car and house, with a mild detergent, dry thorougly, and then apply some type of slick-em. You can reduce the problem by just wiping the weatherstrip dry and applying Armor-all or other slick-em, but to be really effective you need to clean the weatherstrip.
I use Armor-All on the rubber strips on the bottoms of my house doors and magnetic weather strips on the sides and top. Same with the car weather stripping. I also use it on the weather stripping of my vinyl windows. I usually make only one application to the house each hear, and more like 2 or 3 times a year for the autos. You can use any silicone product that is ok on rubber and plastic.
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On Sun, 22 Jan 2006 13:16:13 GMT, "CathyLee"

CathyLee, Try some silicone spray or a light coating of vasoline that should do the trick best regards anthony
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