For Drilling Holes In Tree Stumps

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The idea is to drill holes and fill with a chemical to break down the stumps.
Would a manual bit brace do the trick, or would you use a battery-powered hand drill. What size? Length of bit, etc.? Thanks
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For the size and depth of hole you need, read the instructions that should come with your chemical. The manual method would work, but it'd be a workout. There are drill bits/extensions that'll get you as deep as you need, and I'd put them on a corded electric drill motor. If no juice is available, I'd go with the greatest voltage of cordless I could find. Have fun! Tom Someday, it'll all be over....
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040603 1304 - Tom posted:

Yes, the 3/4" spade bit with an extension would be exceptionally suited for this.
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snipped-for-privacy@email.msn.com ( snipped-for-privacy@my-deja.com) wrote:

3/4" self feed auger bit, in a hand drill. Don't need to go terribly deep, standard 6" bit will do.
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wrote:

Thanks to all for responding.
The bit was $24 at Lowe's. The cheapest drill to handle it was $89. (They tried to sell me a drill for $199.) Worst of all, the potassium nitrate instructions said it would take 4-6 MONTHS to soften the wood for burning. The internet led me to believe it would take 4-6 WEEKS.
Can't rent a grinder because I have no truck to transport it back and forth.
So it's back to the old method I used for the other stumps: An ax and a lot of sweat. There are only 3 stumps remaining anyway.
Sure woulda been nice to find an easier method. At age 60, swinging that ax beats the hell out of my hands and wrist joints.
Thanks again.
Jack
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snipped-for-privacy@windswept.net (BroJack) wrote in wrote:

Sounds like the KNO3 method is tantamount to turning your tree stump into a compost pile, except with industrial strength reagents.
For faster results, you could try drilling more smaller diameter holes instead of just the one. Most people have 3/8" drills, an 8" long bit is another story. If you're stuck with a short length bit, you could always drill a pattern and whack the stump a couple of times to increase the depth and available surface area. Adding water periodically would probably accelerate the results, along with warmer temperatures and. All this being theoretical, never had to do it myself.
Got to go, good luck.
[rec.gardens]
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Home Depot will rent you the truck when you rent the grinder.
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On Fri, 04 Jun 2004 17:20:54 -0600, Dave Balderstone

Actually, I had a stump ground out about 6 years ago in Dallas and it cost us about 45 dollars for someone to come do it.
Need a good, cheap, knowledge expanding present for a friend? http://www.animaux.net/stern/present.html
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That sounds about right. I asked a tree service about grinding (I'm in western Canada) and for the three stumps it worked out to about $200 CAD. This service charged by inch of diameter.
djb
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On Fri, 04 Jun 2004 18:52:57 -0600, Dave Balderstone

Hell, I'd be happy at that price. Internet says $300-400 per tree average. Estimate scheduled for today. Let you guys know.
Jack
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040604 2008 - escapee posted:

I was watching a program on the building of the Erie Canal a few years back and one striking accomplishment I noticed was the method used for removing tree stumps. They had two huge wheels, looked like about 4 horses high from the drawing, with an axle between the two. The axle was placed over the tree stump and a chain was fastened around the axle and then around the tree stump. Chains were then placed around the wheels and then to a team of horses and the wheels were pulled forward. The leverage was such that the stump would easily be removed. It was said that this method was quite effective for its time.
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indago wrote:

Mechanical advantage is the bomb.
But who can store a wheelset four horses high?
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wrote:

There's another device I've seen for pulling stumps. It's a homemade gadget made from a metal tire rim and a piece of I-beam and a couple of pieces of chain. It's basically a big lever to pry the stump out of the ground with the tire rim acting as the fulcrum.
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I've done this and it's a PITA. A good sized ships auger, 3/4" to 1" in diameter and at least 6 to 8" in length. I used a 1/2" drill. I doubt that the typical battery powered drill will do the job with less than 4 to 6 recharges.
Even after you drill the holes and place chemicals in the holes you're looking at several years for the stump to decompose.
A better method is to drill a few holes, load the stump with potassium or sodium nitrate and fuel oil. Get it burning below ground and it will self destruct in a few days. Of course this presumes that there is nothing else combustible nearby.
RB
snipped-for-privacy@my-deja.com wrote:

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You'd be surprised. An ordinary 12V Dewalt drill can do in the neighborhood of 40 holes thru full 2" thick lumber with a 7/8" auger before recharging.
I've also used the same drill/bit to drill series of holes in fenceposts. Also no problem.
The better quality battery units are quite amazing.
--
Chris Lewis, Una confibula non set est
It's not just anyone who gets a Starship Cruiser class named after them.
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Have you actually done the nitrate bit? I've wondered how well that works. I used to use potassium nitrate for making fireworks.
I've heard some where that you can load the holes with powdered milk -- that's supposed to speed up the rot. I've never tried that.
--

Christopher A. Young
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

Yes. Works well. There are commercial products sold for this purpose that are nothing more than KNO3.
RB

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RB wrote:

Pardon me, as I'm not an explosives expert, but don't nitrates and fuel oil make a pretty potent *bang* when you light it? Or do you need something like a blasting cap to create a real explosion?
Along the same lines of thought, though, one could use thermite. A five gallon bucket with a quart or gallon bucket inside it. Load sand around the quart or gallon bucket inside the bigger bucket -- prevents radial spread of the extreme heat generated. Thermite (aluminum powder with iron oxide) in the smaller central bucket. Light it off with a LONG magnesium strip.
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Sporkman wrote:

They will in a confined space but this is not confined so they just burn or smolder.

I thought that the only real purpose for thermite was to "weld" chamber pots under John Harvard's seated statue in the Harvard Yard. ;-)
RB
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With explosives, you must reach the speed of detonation to have an explosion. Explosives are rated in feet per second, that is, a mathematically arrived at figure where you could lay out ten miles of the stuff, and time it from one end to the other. Black powder is slower, hence, you have seen the trail of gunpowder lit by the bank robbers and all snaking its way along. Something like 500 fps. That is low order. High order is in the 24,000 fps and up range.
Many high explosives will burn and not explode. C4 plastic explosive was commonly burned in small food stoves in Viet Nam.
A story is told in "Yankee Autumn in Acadiana", an account of the Civil War movement of the North fighting the South as it progressed through southern Louisiana. A particularly loony soldier would commonly use an unexploded "Parrott" shell as a cook surface by building a fire next to it. These were 16" in diameter. He would turn it flat side up. Other soldiers would stay away from his camp. He said it would not ignite. He was wrong, and one night, it did with him cooking dinner. He was never seen again.
Steve
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