Fluorescent question


I have several "ring" lights in my finished basement. This is unheated except the heat that comes from the furnace itself so it is usually about 55 degrees F. When it is very cold outside (this morning was -2F) the lights won't come on when the switch is first turned on. It takes two or three tries and then the light comes on. When outside temperatures are more moderate there is no problem. The line voltage is a steady 120 volts. This happens every winter. What can cause this?
---MIKE---

>> (44 15' N - Elevation 1580')
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Your standard fluorescent fixtures/bulbs are known for having trouble both starting and producing full, non-flickering light in low temperatures. Once they warm up, they may or may flicker, but they will usually come on. When you apply current by turning the switch on and off you are warming them slightly so they start.
I know that they make zero-degree fixtures and zero-degree tubes, but I don't know about rings. I "upgraded" from a standard 2-bulb 4 ft fixture in my garage to a zero degree set up with much satisfaction.
The folowing deals specifically with compact fluoresents, but most standard fluoresents will behave the same way. From: http://members.misty.com/don/f-lamp.html#sb2
"Like other fluorescents, operation at cold temperatures (under around 50-60 degrees F) may result in reduced light output. Starting may also be erratic, although most compact fluorescent lamps seem to start OK at temperatures near freezing. Many types start OK near zero degrees F. Operation in an enclosed fixture often results in full light output in cool surroundings after the lamp warms up for a few minutes, as long as the initial temperature is high enough to permit a good start. However, enclosing compact fluorescents often impairs their ability to work well at higher temperatures."
---MIKE--- wrote:

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Are they grounded? I have a bunch of them I'm using as temporary lighting, and they are not grounded. Most of the time, most of them don't come on until I touch them. Then I grounded them all and they all come on properly.
--
Steve Barker


"---MIKE---" < snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net> wrote in message
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Normal operation. Ordinary fluorescents don't start at chilly temps. You need high-output fixtures and bulbs.
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Richard J Kinch wrote:

Note: Not all high output lamps are cold rated. However it seems most are.
OP,
Start with checking for a good ground, next replace them with fixtures and lamps that are cold rated. I suggest getting really good fixtures as the cheap ones tend to have far more problems and also tend to buzz.
--
Joseph Meehan

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