Floor insulation ==> frozen pipes???


Floor insulation ==> frozen pipes???
I'm eligible for a low-income weatherization program. They want to put insulation in my floors.
It's a ranch-style frame house 40 years old. Crawl space is closed up during winter. Outside Temperature rarely dips below 20F and I've never had any issues with frozen pipes.
But when the insulation goes in, the crawl space temperature will go down. When I asked about frozen pipes, the answer was, "don't sweat it, we'll insulate the pipes." I didn't think to ask about the sewer pipes. Traps stay full of water.
When I tried to discuss the thermodynamics of the situation, I got a blank stare.
Insulation reduces the rate of heat flow from the pipes, but, eventually, the pipe temp gets to the crawl space temp.
I'm afraid that I'll be trading a few bucks off the gas bill for a lifetime of plumbing problems.
Should I worry about this? Thanks, mike
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
spamme0 wrote:

If outside temp's generally don't get below the low 20s I'd not be particularly concerned. Certainly one way to do it unless the pipes are not directly below the floor joists is to include them above the insulation altho it may be a little more effort.
Adding the insulation to the pipes will certainly help; if there's any area that indicates there's a problem a heat tape could always be used. In general, only hot water supply lines typically cause problems in marginal conditions as the hot water displaces air from the cold supply.
Overall, I think you're probably in good shape and the benefits will be noticeable.
--
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Of all the insulation we have installed, the below the floor in the crawl space did the least good. i did that in a ranch style of similar age, and notice very little if any difference in floor temperature or bills. We have moved and are skipping that step on this house, we have upgraded windows and doors, and are stuffing the outside walls as time permits. That has done so much good, the propane man is barely speaking to us.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
spamme0 wrote:

They get paid by the gov'ment to do what they do. If the taxpayers also pay them to do vasectomies, cross your legs.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
HeyBub wrote:

Better idea, IMHO, to insulate the walls in the crawl space, down to the footers. Also to seal the air leaks at the sill plate, and insulate the band joist spaces. Unless a crawl space is damp, I see no reason to vent it anytime during the year, and most modern houses don't even have vents. Just vapor barrier over the dirt.
-- aem sends...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I've heard of folks piling hay bales around the house. Sounds risking rot and decay, and fire hazzard. But, the concept is sound. I live in a trailer which is also subject to freezing pipes. They put the pipes in the same chase as the heat run, so that helps a lot.
One friend, in a trailer, did have pipes freeze when she ran out of propane. She has two tanks. Didn't want to leave one tank turned off "cause it might run out in the middle of the night". So, she ran both tanks out, and then had no heat for several bitter cold days in the deep winter, while waiting for the propane truck. She left the cold faucet dribbling, and the hot water line froze.
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.