filling holes from drywall anchors after removing them

I live in an apartment where I must remove all of the drywall anchors before moving out. Is there a product designed to fill these larger holes (around 1/8") rather than just using plain spackle (which may not effectively fill them?
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for 6 hours or so before putting on the second pass.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Toothpaste. Sometimes you can even match the color of the wall.
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alt.home.repair:

Do NOT use toothpaste. It dries, shrinks, and falls out of the hole. If you paint it, it dissolves in the paint.
Spackle is purposely made for this application. Just put on a couple of applications.
--
Steve B.
New Life Home Improvement
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HeyBub wrote:

the "advice experts".
Its water soluble and won't stand up to paint and just dries and shrinks.
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wrote:

Many, many moons ago when I was a cave dweller (that's what some folks down here use as a derrogatory term for renters) I used caulk. Give it a little tap with your finger or a wet sponge and it looks like a textured wall.
--
JC from Gnat Flats




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You could use pintable caulking which will fill the holes nicely.
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On Oct 2, 3:04 am, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Use the spaackle or joint compound or plaster of paris, whichever you have on hand. They shrink a bit so do it twice. Use a wet but not dripping sponge to clean up instead of sanpaper and what is left will only be in the holes and barely noticed. Refrain from using toothpaste it will show through the next paint job as a greasy spot.
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On Oct 2, 2:04 am, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Spackle it with 2 or 3 coats is the right way, forget the toothpaste (I think single women moving out of apartments thought of that one). 3 inch taping knife should be fine.
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RickH wrote:

Actually I saw the suggestion on a TV home decorating program. The host of the show, however, did go on about the right color shoes to wear during the remodel. He used words that I think are colors (taupe, puce, teal, etc.), so I'm not sure of his gender... You may be right.
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wrote:

Play it safe. Refer to as "shim".
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Haha, years ago when I was in nursing school living in a dorm, toothpaste was "the" way to fill in holes. All of the rooms had lovely institutional green paint, and there was a toothpaste brand that matched it almost exactly. So yeah, the "single ladies" theory is pretty accurate, LOL.

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On 2 Oct, 03:04, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

For what it's worth, there's at least one brand of spackle that goes on pink and turns white when dry. While it may sound like a waste of technology, it's not a bad idea if you're in a hurry, especially if you need a second application for a deep hole or you want to start painting ASAP. It's kind of nice to know as soon as it's OK to sand or re-apply that second layer.
By the way, unless you're hiding this project from the landlord, it might help to ask if they're going to be painting after you leave. If you agree beforehand that you will repair the holes and prepare them for paint (fill, sand, prime) then perhaps (s)he won't try to add this to the list of things (s)he's going to deduct from your deposit.
(S)He could look at the repairs, and even if they are perfect, charge you for them anyway. Some landlords are like that.
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DerbyDad03 wrote:
SNIP HAPPENS

Theres a fun way of dealing with landlords who start with holding deposit money for thigs like nail holes and wall anchor patches.
The landlord (not he manager or management company, but the landlord who actually owns the buildng) is without fdoubt depeciating the building on the landlord's federal and state income taxes.
Among other things, that depreciation covers ordinary wear and tear, and small items like the kind of repair the OP is talking about. A 3 foot x 2 foot hole punched into a gypsum wall is a different isssue, but wall anchors and repairs for wall anchors are normal wear and tear
Its always fun, in the cases where I represented a tenant being screwed this way bu a management company or landlord to remind the landlord and the property manager that bullshit deductions for ordinary wear and tear will result in a certified mail letter the local IRS district office and the state income tax folks about the obvious tax fraud being perpetrated by the landlord in taking the deduction for depreciation each of the years you lived in the rental.
Amazing how quickly sense overtakes the greed of the management companies and landlords. taxing
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What is there to charged if its perfect?

I had a tenant with hundreds of holes which maybe ok if he didn't patch it up. But than he butchered the walls with patches so bad that you need to cut it out and refinish (patch, texture and paint) the wall correctly.

I consider a few ok but what do you do when a tenant use 3" nails every 6" apart on you fascia boards all around the exterior of the house for Xmas decoration? The repair by a licensed painter may exceed the deposit.
I had a tenant rip off the structural wall bracing and repatch it so you couldn't tell and another one replaced the plywood subfloor with OSB. What can you do when you find out long after they moved out?

Actually it should be deprecated from the day placed in service. In any case, what do you report and how is this a tax fraud? Depreciation is not a free ride, its recaptured at 25%. Even if the property is fully depreciated, he is entitled to the value of repair within reason. Tenants and landlords have two different definitions of wear and tear - this is what pictures and small claim is for. This is my experience of ware and tear, and as you can see, its really accelerated in a rental:
Interior paint - house, 15 years rental, 4 years
Carpet - house, 20 years rental, 5 years
Landscape - house, 15 years rental, 7 years

I couldn't see how management companies benefit from being greedy - they make a percentage from rent collected, not how much they rip you off from the deposit.
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DerbyDad03 wrote: ...

If they're perfect, how's he going to find them? :)
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Perfect eyesight???
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