Felt/housewrap tape

Hi all,
I'm replacing some rotten masonite siding and OSB/fiber sheathing on some places around the bottom of the house. I would like to put up some housewrap/bulding paper to stop the water infiltration, but I can only extend the paper up about 2-3 feet (i.e. can't run it from the top down).
What kind of tape/caulk can I use to seal the top? I know there is specific tape for housewrap - what would seal the building paper with?
Thanks, Budman
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Budman wrote:

There are rolls of adhesive flashing, think Ice & Water Shield, that come in 4" widths. Vycor is one brand name. The stuff isn't as cheap as some other tapes, but it will stick. Figure 50' roll ~ $15.
R
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If I understood what you said, you currently have felt paper over the OSB and you are replacing the lower part of that with house wrap.
The house wrap tape does not stick well to the felt paper. The only product that I know that will bond to both is a product called Protectowrap. It is sold for sealing around windows. It will bond to OSB, felt and housewrap. It seals best when applied and then exposed to sunlight for a day or two.
Colbyt
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No - there is currently no housewrap or paper on the house.
I want to install some, but I can only do it under the siding I am replacing - this siding is in high moisture areas.
I need to fix the moisture problems, but in the meantime I want to add some protection between the siding and sheathing. However, if the water runs down behind the paper, it will probably make things worse.
Thanks, Budman
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snipped-for-privacy@unx.sas.com says...

As noted above, trapping moisture between the sheathing and housewrap/felt-paper/siding in not good.
If water is running down between the siding and sheathing it is best to stop the water from getting behind the siding. ..... Water should not be able to get behind the siding!!
The first priority should be preventing water from getting behind the siding. Housewrap/felt behind the siding is a secondary line of defense.
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MikeP wrote:

We should be careful with the wording here... The notion that water cannot get behind properly installed siding has been shown though exhaustive research to be false. It stems from thinking only in terms water draining due to gravity, while overlooking factors like wind driven rain, condensation, capillary action, and leaky window assemblies. There is literally no siding product in common use that does not get water behind it. This includes wood, fiber cement, and other bevel sidings, stucco, brick, metal, and vinyl. Wide eves and proper siding installation of course minimize water intrusion, but won't eliminate it completely. For more information on this subject visit www.buildingscience.com or look for articles by Joe Lstiburek and others in all the common construction journals. IMO, knowing what we now know, the only prudent plan is to install siding over furing or plastic mesh to create a drainiage plain and promote ventilation. This is what's commonly refered to as a rainscreen wall. For new construction, it adds only a few hundred dollars to a typical siding installation. The benefits include longer life for both siding and finishes, and much less chance of structural rot and/or mold. In Washington State, many of the larger production builders have started to baseline rainscreen construction, perhaps out of fear of mold litigation. Even in a partial retrofit application like the OP is facing there are options. I've seen at least one housewrap (GreenGuard) that incorporates thick fiber bands to create a minimal drainiage plain between the siding and sheathing. I'm not sure this would be as effective as the 1/4"-3/8" space typical of furing or mesh installations, but it would certainly be better than nothing. I've seen quite a few houses going up in my area using this product, so I'd imagine it's not much more than ordinary housewrap.
Richard Johnson PE Camano Island, WA
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