Extend old worn in-wall wiring

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micky wrote:

Maybe nicks in the wire when stripper is used improperly.
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On Fri, 4 Sep 2015 23:32:05 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@at.BioStrategist.dot.dot.com wrote:

http://model-railroad-hobbyist.com/sites/model-railroad-hobbyist.com/files/users/JC%20Shall/Spade%20Lug.jpg
I am not exactly sure I understand your question, but if I understand correctly the wire broke off near the terminal screw at a switch.
If that is true, the weakness could be caused by someone using strippers incorrectly. If they used the wrong size hole in wire stripers this can cause a weakness.
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On Friday, September 4, 2015 at 10:41:12 PM UTC-4, Seymore4Head wrote:

And if that's the problem, then you can just strip more of the insulation off the end. If the wire is too short to have enough to properly reach the switch, then add another 6" piece and use a wire nut to secure it to the existing wire.
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On Friday, September 4, 2015 at 10:41:12 PM UTC-4, Seymore4Head wrote:

Are lugs of that type allowed by code to be used inside a switch or receptacle box?

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i have a 100% solution for broken wires where the box is too small and the wires too short. install new wiring and abandon the original box, thats what blank covers are for:)
sometimes its just easier.
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True, but painful
*+-i have a 100% solution for broken wires where the box is too small and the wires too short. install new wiring
                 - = - Vasos Panagiotopoulos, Columbia'81+, Reagan, Mozart, Pindus, BioStrategist          http://www.panix.com/~vjp2/vasos.htm ---{Nothing herein constitutes advice. Everything fully disclaimed.}--- [Homeland Security means private firearms not lazy obstructive guards] [Urb sprawl confounds terror] [Phooey on GUI: Windows for subprime Bimbos]
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On Fri, 4 Sep 2015 23:32:05 +0000 (UTC), snipped-for-privacy@at.BioStrategist.dot.dot.com wrote:

Use a good brand of butt connector for the size wire you have. Be sure the crimper you use is the right type for the connector.
--
Mr.E

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There is only one "butt" connector approved for joining solid copper to solid aluminum wiring and it requires a special tool that can only be rented or leased from the manufacturer by operators trained and certified in it's use. Can't remember the name at the moment.
Ah-yes. It's Copalum
The"ideal" wire-nut designed for joining copper and aluminum is also falling out of favor as the failure rate of connections using the product is higher than anticipated - and higher than acceptable. The only good and simple way to use aluminum wiring is with devices specifically designed for use with aluminum wiring and designated as CO-ALR devices. Installed according to the included directions, particularly on second generation Al wire, they are as safe and reliable as using copper wire.
If you need to connect aluminum to copper the new Alumiconn connectors also work very well but they take up a lot of box space and are not cheap.
I have replaced all devices in my home with CO-ALR devices (about 5 or 6 times the price of standard "big box" copper only devices - and in the process found NO connections that showed ANY sign of overheating or poor connections (other than a few outlets that had obviously lost the tension in the place receptors, causing poor connection between plug and outlet - which is not wiring related)
My house was wired in 1974 with the "second generation" aluminum wire. (aa8800) by a master electrician I knew very well, without the help of an apprentice.. I bought the house when it was 8 years old and there have been no modifications/additions made since I bought it - and the basement was professionally wired with copper by the first owner.
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On Sat, 05 Sep 2015 09:53:06 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

What's different about the CO-ALR devices? I'm assuming you mean switch's and receptacles.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca posted for all of us...

+1
--
Tekkie

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Many thanks. DIdn't realise there wasn an al-cu issue, tho we have only 1965 copper. (In 1980, I dropped electrochem to take stat thermo instead!)
Basically it is the two places I have replaced switches most often. One in th ebathroom, I put a series of timers and humidity detectors. THe timer is acting up but is ok if I don't set it to max. (BTW< after trying a series of humidity detectors, th eone from Broan works great - 55% winter 75% summer for bath fan). THe othe ris my study where i have replaced over five dimmers in the past twenty years.
THe last time, a few years go, the tips of the wire broke off.
I imagine I can just extend the wire the traditional way, splice another piece of wire, but I'm afraid it is too "fragile". I could solder it and tape it. Of course the "code" rule would be to run the wire new from the fuse box. (I co-own the hosue with two uncles who are electrical engineers and they can be very obsessive.)
I have come across some boxes in the house where it seems the builder extended the wire because it was too short?
                 - = - Vasos Panagiotopoulos, Columbia'81+, Reagan, Mozart, Pindus, BioStrategist          http://www.panix.com/~vjp2/vasos.htm ---{Nothing herein constitutes advice. Everything fully disclaimed.}--- [Homeland Security means private firearms not lazy obstructive guards] [Urb sprawl confounds terror] [Phooey on GUI: Windows for subprime Bimbos]
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