Extend old worn in-wall wiring

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Are there special kits and procedures when the wires for a switch have broken too often at the tips? I fixe dtwo switched two years ago like that and although the need isn't urgent, I could seeit arising in a few months.
                 - = - Vasos Panagiotopoulos, Columbia'81+, Reagan, Mozart, Pindus, BioStrategist          http://www.panix.com/~vjp2/vasos.htm ---{Nothing herein constitutes advice. Everything fully disclaimed.}--- [Homeland Security means private firearms not lazy obstructive guards] [Urb sprawl confounds terror] [Phooey on GUI: Windows for subprime Bimbos]
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On 9/4/2015 4:32 PM, snipped-for-privacy@at.BioStrategist.dot.dot.com wrote:

Why are the wires breaking? There should be no mechanical stresses transfered to the wires from the user's operation of the switch.
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In alt.home.repair, on Fri, 04 Sep 2015 17:03:39 -0700, Don Y

Good question. Is someone bending them back and forth until they break. How old is the house? I've never had one break.
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wrote:

I've got aluminum wire in one house. Very few have broken but some have been squished by 40 years of pressure of the push in connections on the switches and receptacles that they no longer have enough pressure to maintain solid contact. I often pigtail a copper wire to them to avoid a repeat.
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On 09/04/2015 08:11 PM, Ashton Crusher wrote:

Unless you use a connector or paste, specifically designed to connect copper to aluminum you have a fire risk. If copper is connected directly to aluminum there will be galvanic corrosion which can arc.
I would totally get rid of the aluminum wire even though it's obviously going to be a big job.
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Although pigtailing copper to aluminum without the proper connector or paste is not a good idea, it is far less dangerous than using aluminum wire in "backstab" receptacles. That practice has NEVER been approved, and is one of the worst things you can do with aluminum wiring, safety and reliability-wise.
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On 09/05/2015 08:23 AM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:
<snip>

Agreed
and for that matter I don't use the "backstab" at all...
I take the few extra seconds it takes to use the screw connection and make sure it's tight.
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The new "back feed" devices are pretty good. They don't use a springtab - they use a screw but do not require bending the wire to fit around the screw, and the co-alr devices have a set pressure due to usre of a bellview type spring washer.
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On 9/5/2015 4:02 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:
>

Some I've seen, I call em back clamp. Which is fine with me.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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On Sun, 6 Sep 2015 17:38:37 -0700 (PDT), Uncle Monster

That's the animal. great for a DIY install because it is pretty hard to screw up the installation.
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I installed commercial grade receptacles in our kitchen when we built our house. Like you, I figured they would be a better choice for outlets that would have things plugged and unplugged frequently.
However, after a couple months of living in the house, I replaced them with the cheap 59 cent versions. The insertion and withdrawal pressure needed with the commercial receptacles was just too excessive. It was very difficult to plug anything in, and it seemed like the plug would be damaged trying to unplug the device. Either that or we would end up getting shocked wrestling with the plug.
The cheap receptacles are easier to insert plugs into. If they start to wear out, it's easy to replace the outlet with another cheap socket. Replacing a broken appliance cord is often a lot more work and expense.
The one situation I can see the commercial sockets working better is for outlets where appliances are always plugged in, like a microwave or something.
For what it's worth, we've lived in our house 11 years now and the cheap sockets still work like the day I installed them.
Just my experience...
Anthony Watson www.watsondiy.com www.mountainsoftware.com
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I don't recall the brand, just whatever upgrade I could find at the home centers. I think I paid $3-5 for each of them at the time.
I was really surprised how much force it took to plug something in. On more than one occasion, my wife called me in the kitchen to plug things in for her, or unplug something she had plugged in. We still have a few of them in areas we don't use often, and they haven't gotten any weaker with time.
It is somewhat easier with newer appliances that have thumb grips on the plugs. They give you something to grab hold of to remove the plug. However, we have a couple of old appliances (like an old blender I inherited from my mom) that just have straight plugs (no thumb grips). Those are very difficult to unplug from the commercial sockets, there's just nothing to hold on to.
Anthony Watson www.watsondiy.com www.mountainsoftware.com
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Hospital grade. Heating up of lose contacts. Great advice! This newgroup is tops. Thanks!
                 - = - Vasos Panagiotopoulos, Columbia'81+, Reagan, Mozart, Pindus, BioStrategist          http://www.panix.com/~vjp2/vasos.htm ---{Nothing herein constitutes advice. Everything fully disclaimed.}--- [Homeland Security means private firearms not lazy obstructive guards] [Urb sprawl confounds terror] [Phooey on GUI: Windows for subprime Bimbos]
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On 09/05/2015 03:02 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Sounds like a great idea, now that I think of it I have seen a few of those.
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On Sat, 05 Sep 2015 09:23:58 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

It must have been "ok", that is, not prohibited by code, back in 1971 in AZ since they built many subdivisions by some of the largest homebuilders that way for about 5 years until the problems started showing up.
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philo wrote:

Wow! push in connection with Al. wire? At least it better be Al. specific parts.

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wrote:

No such part exists.

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I agree with you that what you say is what's always said and may well be true in the overall sense. However, I didn't know about it years ago when these squish terminals started causing these problems. The squish area would get loose enough that arcing would occur there and the receptacle would "Fry". So I fixed them as I mentioned. Some of those technically incorrect repairs are now 20 + years old, as old as the system was when the first squish problems popped up. Yet none of those repaired and pigtailed receptacles has ever had a recurrence of the problem, they have all been fine for their 20+ years. Also, I have occasionally had to pull these and replace them if, for example, the receptacle was painted over too many times, or the plastic cracked from a tenant twisting a plug, etc. On a couple of them I have looked to see if there is any evidence of galvanic corrosion where I've pigtailed copper to aluminum and there has not been any evidence of it. In the 40+ years I've owned the place the only problem that's ever come up from the aluminum wires is that they squish, both under the spring push in gizmos as well as under screws (I have to retighten all the fuse panel screws that hold the wires on to the neutral buss and the breakers about every 15 years. And for the places where the aluminum was twisted around a screw, if that gets redone more then once the brittleness of the AL often results in it breaking and I'll have to strip back the wire to get a fresh start... which is why I also went to pig tailing those so I wouldn't run out of wire.
I'm not disagreeing at all with what "good practice" would be, just saying that the corrosion issue and need for special connectors and anti-corrosion pastes, which I never used, has not shown up as a problem in these many many years. Perhaps it's due to AZ's very low humidity. Last time I worked on the wires to add some GFI's I was going to use the special connectors and paste but couldn't find any at the usual retail outlets so just did it the same as in the past.
If anyone is still reading and is "in the biz", have you ever worked with aluminum and actually seen problems from not using the special connectors and anti-corrosion paste?
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On 09/05/2015 01:01 PM, Ashton Crusher wrote:

The low humidity may have helped.
My only experience was with a high-powered transformer when one of the terminals burned off. I cut back into good aluminum and crimped a copped lug onto it.
It eventually burned off...however even if I used an approved lug my guess is that it would have burned off too...so that's not much to go on
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High humidity here in the "interlaken" region of Southern Ontario hasn.t seemed to cause any problems.
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