Ever work on an oil rig?

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Another crazy thing on the news about the oil leak last night. They are saying BP is having some giant bell shaped metal boxes constructed with piping attached. The idea is to lower them down over the leaking areas on the ocean bottom, trap the oil and pump it out at the surface. Two things immediately stand out. First, they said it will take 1 1/2 weeks to build them. WTF? You would think in an emergency like this, any reasonable iron yard could do this in 1 day.
Second, why aren't such devices already in existence and ready to go? I would think there would have been an entity supported and funded by ALL the oil companies that are doing underwater drilling. That entity would not only have all the equipment necessary to deal with actual oil spills, but also would do research on ideas of how to deal with this, eg the bell collector gizmo, failsafe valves, etc. They could have proper eqpt built, tested, ready to go, etc. Instead, apparently we are relying on thinking things up in the middle of a crisis. It would only make sense to have some collective resource pooling, no? That way each company could have a much larger and better response to any spill than any one of them could individually.
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

I suspect it would take a huge device to trap the oil AND withstand the force of the oil spewing and the ocean currents.
I'm wondering if all the rain in TN and AR will help the fisheries by washing oil away from shore...hope so. We've had enough disasters/wars to last a while and hurricane season is here.
Here is a simplistic view of the leak site: http://www.tampabay.com/specials/2010/reports/oil_spill_clean_up/methods-to-stop-oil-leak /
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It's something to consider. (unless you believe in that "see no evil" stuff...) That blowout preventer had multiple protection layers,and ALL of them failed.
There's a pattern here,and statements have been made that leads one to believe all this is NOT accidental,if one connects the dots,particularly considering the methods ComradeObama uses and believes in;Alinsky. "dirty tricks" are not unheard of;remember Nixon's Watergate for one example. These accidents all aid ComradeObama's goals too well,and are too timely.

True,but I was only discussing electricity generation. It will be even worse if all-electric motor vehicles are mandated. Our ECONOMY depends on cheap energy,and the only reasonable,practical methods are all being BLOCKED. Intentionally!

See,there's the gist of it; cheap energy allows people to better their lifestyle,and also allows government to do more for the people. Costly energy puts people out of work,and lowers the standard of living.

If solar,passive or active, and your "out in the boonies windmill" are such a good idea,they would be used WITHOUT any Federal mandates needed. But they are not cost-competitive and have other drawbacks.
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Jim Yanik
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On 5/3/2010 11:11 AM, Jim Yanik wrote:

So that means if something is cheap we should just be as wasteful as possible?

They are a good idea where they work. Makes lots of sense to put windmills up out in the Great Plains states. Its just the current government idea of handing out subsidies for solar or wind whether they make sense or not that is completely stupid.
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:
-snip-

Here's another schematic that shows the 16'x40', 5way blowout preventer. It also gives a better idea of the layout than anything I've seen elsewhere- http://www.nytimes.com/2010/05/01/us/01engineering.html?ref=us
Enlarge the inset for some more info.
Jim
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I'm glad you finally got to your point in your last two sentences, because the rest of your post is gibberish. There is no such thing as fail safe, and when you're controlling something through 5,000 feet of water, it multiplies the problem exponentially. But then zero to the nth power is still zero. But you know that, don't you.
If you're so smart, I can head you to all sorts of companies who can use your oilfield expertise.
Steve
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A fool shows his annoyance at once, but a prudent man overlooks an insult.
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Despite claiming to know so much about the subject and going on the attack, it's obvious you don't even understand some of the most basic terminology. Failsafe does not mean that the system cannot ever fail. It means it's designed so that in the event something goes wrong, the system is designed to fail with no damage or minimized damage. In this case, it would mean having a valve in place that requires constant contact with the rest of the world to stay open. If that contact is lost, then it automatically closes. That contact could be a hydraulic line, etc that has to be pressurized to keep the valve open. Or it could be an electric signal that holds the valve open. If you had TWO of those that are independent and in series, that would be a failsafe type of design.
Now, since you hint at knowing so much from personal experience, why haven't we learned a single thing in this thread that sheds any light on how these things work? Is there one valve or two independent ones. Do they require action to make them close or close by themselves?

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As you can see by my posts if you had thoroughly read them, I have said that I have no experience with deep water drilling, and deep water drillheads. I therefore gracefully withdrew from that discussion, and kept it to general topics and general points. Unlike you who, with zero experience comes up with all sorts of whimsical suggestions, but always prefaced with, "I'm not experienced with this, but why can't they .......?"
The thing is off and running. Could they have shut it off, it wouldn't be off and running. Something screwed up. But you seem more intent on getting on to the guilty and going over the issue of responsibility.
It is obvious you know nothing of this and have no experience, since you have never stated an answer to even the subject line.
You may go now.
Steve
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So, in other words, despite crowing about experience and going on the attack, you don't know anything about how the offshore well protection system work either. But you have a problem with people raising questions and interested in finding out. You may be comfortable with writing it off as "sh** happens" and comparing it to Chernobyl, which is a piss poor example because that WAS avoidable, but I doubt that will satisfy the official investigation.
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snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote: (snip)
If there are not multiple independent valve systems

What I expect WE are gonna get out of this is the return of $4 a gallon gas, somewhere between Memorial day and 4th of July. Labor day at the latest.
Well, the cheap-gas side effect of the economic almost-collapse a year ago was nice while it lasted. Here in SW MI, it has been dancing with $3 a gallon for the last couple of weeks- 2 steps up, then 1 step down.
Guess I better fill up the lawnmower can while I am thinking about it. :^(
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aem sends....

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back up to $4 I can almost guarantee another collapse.
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I get off on '57 Chevys
I get off on screamin' guitars
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First- thanks for elucidation on some of this stuff-- and for the links to Greg's pictures.

-snip-
-snip-
Really--- It does seem so simple that one wonders why they didn't have one of those domes standing by in the gulf waiting for a disaster to happen. Rather than wait 2 weeks for them to cob something together.
How big is that pipe that is leaking? diameter? Length?
Jim
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Think vertical. IIRC, it's the well head that was damaged. A well head sticks up, and is about ten feet tall. Different valves on it, going to different diameters within the whole well, to different depths. The wells we drilled started out with up to a 48" diameter caisson pipe for the first pipe, that being driven down until bedrock was contacted. Then successively smaller diameter pipes inside that, which would not essentially add to the height. What adds to the height is when one depth of pipe goes into an oil bearing strata, and they need to leave the top a little longer so they can put a valve on it. Then the next size smaller has to pass through that and up, and the process is repeated. Oilwells are pipes within pipes, each one getting smaller, and each one going deeper.
Steve
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Steve B wrote:

What I remember reading is there are multiple leaks in the pipe from the well head to the surface. Does the pipe still go to the surface?
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Think.
The well head is 5,000 feet under water. All oil wells offshore, whether on a platform, or by themselves in deep water like this one, are plumbed to a system of pipes that take the oil from there straight to the refinery. None is loaded on transport ships anywhere in US waters. It all goes through pipelines on the bottom of the ocean to the refineries.
Steve
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Steve B wrote:

What am I supposed to think about.
Reports I have read are that the well head is OK (except blow out preventer does not work). The reports are that the pipe that went to the surface has multiple leaks.
They were going to temporarily abandon the site and work on another. I would assume the pipe to the surface that they were working on would remain on the surface until they came back to work on "pilelines ... to the refineries." The pipe could have gone down with the drill rig. It could have been damaged (causing the leaks) by the drill rig sinking. If the pipe still goes to the surface, the leaks are more likely to come up in a smaller area. If the pipe is lying on the bottom the leaks are more likely to be spread out, and more difficult to catch unless there are multiple "domes" - the intended point of the question. In any case, there are multiple leak points.
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Steve B wrote:

Thanks for that "air lift" explanation Steve....
The news keeps calling it a "BP" spill, but my understanding is that Transocean (The contractor BP hired and the owner of the now sunken floating drill platform) seems like they should be the responsible party.
But, I supposed that if I hired a contractor to paint my house and one of his guys let a ladder get loose, it fell over a fence and seriously injured my neighbor's kid, I and my homeowner's insurance would probably be involved, especially if the damages were severe enough to exceed the contractor's insurance.
So, realizing that lawyers always seek the deepest pockets, I called my broker this morning and sold all the BP stock in my portfolio.
Jeff
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jeff_wisnia wrote:

I can understand that BP will not be a favoured stock across The Pond. This has added to the reputation after the Texas City refinery explosion in 2005!
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It is so absolutely amusing to watch people who have no knowledge discuss a subject so deeply and intensely, yet say, "I don't know", "I'm not sure how that works," etc.
Steve
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It's far more interesting that the one guy who claims to have personal experience in the relevant area hasn't contributed one single fact or explanation to this thread that sheds any light on the actual discussion. Instead, you just beat your chest in self-important fashion and go on the attack.
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