electrical service to garage

There is an overhead wire extending from a junction box above my back door to the garage which is twelve feet away. The existing wire which is frayed provides power for a small flourescent light in the garage and one AC outlet. What is the proper type of wire that should be used to replace the overhead wire? A brick patio between the house and garage make burying the wire infeasible. Thanks.
JS
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On Tue, 29 Jan 2008 12:30:50 -0500, "DJ Redlocks"

Sunlight resistant UF cable supported by a messenger wire will work.
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On Jan 29, 1:09�pm, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

gee have you considered underground? you could drill that far
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On Tue, 29 Jan 2008 10:53:42 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@aol.com"

The part where he says..... "A brick patio between the house and garage make burying the wire infeasible" didn't tip you off? <grin>
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n>- Hide quoted text -

if he has a basement, you drill underground, while standing in basement, its really easy.
my best friend went 30 feet in zero weather to run a replacemnent power line underground.
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" snipped-for-privacy@aol.com" wrote:

Further, most brick patios are not cemented or grouted, but rather set in sand for drainage. If this is the case, it would be very easy to disassemble a narrow strip of the patio, run conduit and then reassemble the patio.
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On Tue, 29 Jan 2008 14:29:44 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@aol.com"

That is true. If you can get a good shot at the end of a pipe you can bore with it easier than you would think.
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wrote:

I doubt it is easier than lacing UF to a galvanized cable (the stuff you "guy wire" TV antennas with) and stringing it where the old overhead used to be. Make drip loops where it goes into the bell boxes and hook up 6 wires.
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Terry wrote:

And do what on the other end? Break the garage floor and dig a pit there to catch the other end of the conduit? He isn't putting a machine shop out there- he just needs a 15 amp circuit for a light and a convenience outlet. Sure, in a perfect world, a buried line would be best, but an aerial drop with the proper hangers on each end is a dirt-common low-buck solution, especially on older houses. I've seen hundreds just like it. (And also lotsa hillbilly rewires with romex wound around some big nails on each end.)
Note to OP- as long as you will have it apart anyway, best to put that run on a GFCI on the house end.
aem sends...
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