Electrical outlets and switches screws

Hi,
I keep losing the screws from outlets and switches, even when they have those little tags to prevent them from being lost. Can you tell me what standard size and thread density those screws are.
Many thanks in advance,
Aaron
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Aaron Fude wrote:

6-32, usually 1" long. Flat or pan head - I prefer flat because it helps the cover plate sit flatter if the box is slightly proud of the wall.
nate
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6-32 x one inch

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Aaron Fude wrote:

You can get boxes of them in the electrical section of the box stores.
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On Sat, 27 Dec 2008 18:09:27 -0800 (PST), Aaron Fude

The ones that fasten the switch to the box are 6-32
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On Dec 28, 1:20am, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Yes and keep any any/all screws from old and scrapped outlet boxes and switches etc. Very useful if you need an extra ground screw which is missing or lost from an octagon box or to secure a fixture hanging plate etc. Also keep some older switch plates etc. Not everything uses modern white, new pattern or white older pattern or cream (off white) etc. Some of the stuff in this house is brown. Glanced at the brown outlet cover for the clothes washer duplex outlet other day, in this 38 year old house. It's of a pattern that was used back in the 1920s! It does however surround a more modern, properly grounded, 3 pin duplex receptacle. Probably found it somewhere and used it back when building this house.
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terry wrote:

speaking of plates... why is it that old houses with brass switchplates had nice crisp corners and the plates were generally solid brass, but the new brass switchplates that you can buy are actually brass plated steel and the "edges" are all sloppy and rounded-over?
Yes, I actually went to the trouble of finding vintage brass switchplates for the one bedroom I wanted to do with an old school motif. It makes me happy. The switchplate screws are 6-32 as well, I know this because I had to order a box of brass screws from McMaster-Carr to install them.
nate
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wrote:

It's not a matter of old switch plates vs. new switch plates. These days you can get a much wider variety of plate materials. Solid brass in brushed or polished finishes are still made, as well as brushed stainless, and chrome, they just cost more than painted steel, or plastic
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The new stuff is chinese crap.. Because Americsns, on the whole, are too cheap to pay for quality.
Most solid brass ones available today are made in India.
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Nate Nagel wrote:

Lots of folks only consider low cost not value when buying (the walmart syndrome) so manufacturers make the low quality stuff that people want.

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