Electrical Outlet In Vanity - Code?


On an episode of Ask This Old House, they replaced a vanity that had a GFCI mounted in the side of it. It was the only outlet in the bathroom and the homeowner didn't want to lose it.
After installing a new in-stock Borg vanity, Rich cut a hole in the thin side wall of the vanity and mounted the original metal receptacle box using Madison hangers.
It didn't really seem like the most secure installation considering the thickness of the vanity side panel.
Does that type of installation meet code?
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I saw that episode and thought the same thing. But he could have just screwed the box to the cabinet also by using the ears on the box instead of using the clips. The cabinet looked at least 1/2" thick. Or he could have used a plastic old work box with the brackets that hold the box in place. I think the cable was Romex. But I'm pretty sure its code to use the Madison clips.
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wrote:

I saw that episode and thought the same thing. But he could have just screwed the box to the cabinet also by using the ears on the box instead of using the clips. The cabinet looked at least 1/2" thick. Or he could have used a plastic old work box with the brackets that hold the box in place. I think the cable was Romex. But I'm pretty sure its code to use the Madison clips.
There are all manner of clips that meet code, Madison bars may not be the best choice for this application
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It does if the outlet is within 3 feet of the basin and no more than 12" below the countertop. I don't know that I would hold the box with Madison bars though.

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*I saw that episode. I would have tried to reroute the wires and put the outlet in the wall since everything was apart. The outlet had two cables coming into it. He could have put a junction box below and snaked a wire up the wall on the back or side. He did not seem to do a very good job installing the Madison bars and he could have used some small wood screws into the cabinet to make it secure. One thing that I considered a safety issue was that the GFI receptacle was one of those 20 year old + models with the receptacles turned sideways. It may not even function as a GFI anymore. That should have been replaced.
This is a good reason not to ask a plumber to do electrical work.
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John Grabowski wrote:

I agree. While madisons are OK screws would have been a lot more secure. But worse, It looked to me like the madison clips were *very* loose. And I don't think the romex was secured within 12" of the box.

Yea - I had that thought too. I have not been real fond of any of the electricians they have used. This 'electrician' was way below what I expect from TOH. Surprised a licensed plumber would do it.
A recent episode showed adding an outside TV antenna. There were major violations of the NEC and of the manufacturers instructions.
--
bud--


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On TV shows, there are no codes..That's why they display the disclaimer.. Do at your own risk. It's entertainment.
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rlz wrote:

TOH has work done by competent professionals and the work is inspected.
For ATOH, most work that involves codes is done by Tom Silva or the plumber, sometimes a guest electrician.
I think a lot of people watch both shows because the work is done right. I expect that is why Derby posted his question. I don't remember any other time the plumber did electrical except replacement of a garbage disposal. The only really bad advice I remember was the TV antenna installation where the installer couldn't even RTFM.
--
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On 1/25/2010 07:38, bud-- wrote:

I was astonished when the electrician demonstrated how to set up temporary construction power bypassing a meter, main disconnect, or local grounding. Or is that an acceptable practice for pros?
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Bob wrote:

What I remember is it was a temporary connection to provide power while service was taken down and reinstalled. I assume it would last a day or two until the new service panel was connected. Could be local practice to avoid noise from generators. What I remember is there was something like SO cord from the utility overhead drop to a box with overcurrent protection and receptacles. Would think they should have driven a ground rod but I don't remember one.
Loss to the utility should be pretty negligible.
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*Bypassing a meter equates to stealing electricity which is a crime. A temporary service has the same code requirements as a permanent service and requires a permit and inspection.
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Most likely, rather unsafe also.
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On Tue, 26 Jan 2010 07:54:54 -0500, "John Grabowski"

... actually even more stringent. To start with temporary power requires GFCI protection on all 15 &20a 120v circuits.
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On Sun, 24 Jan 2010 08:37:50 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03

What "code?" There is a national code and local code. Not having an outlet near the sink would not make it very convenient to use a corded shaver, which is my all-time favorite. I have not read anything the in the NEC about the thickness of a wall, but can not imagine anything thinner than 1/4", the thickness of typical wall paneling. The GFCI circuit is a good idea and required for bathroom outlets.
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