Electric Water Heater Maintenance

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That is.... about a 1 1/5 inch diameter vacuum hose. It was long enough to be able to get around the inside bottom of the tank.
The old element was bad so I just replaced with a new element and it was good for a long time.
Steve
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These things are truly shamefully cheap and useless. The smallest bit of sediment / debris will clog it, and it's the debris you need to get rid of.
Install a short nipple (die-electric)
I'm wondering why you recommend a dielectric at this point. Must be a good reason, but there's no downstream connection to anything, so what purpose would the thermoplastic lining serve? What complications would a regular galvanized nipple introduce? (For example, the one I installed in mine about three years ago?) in

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wrote:

No, actually you may be right. Being the drain is not permanently connected to anything outside of it, it may not be necessary. Water heaters just seem to be real suseptable to minerals and deposits clogging the fittings. Ive replaced water heaters that had the dielectric nipples in both the hot and cold and also have the reverse flow plastic check valves in them. All done correctly yet when I pull them loose for replacement they look completly clogged. Its what they recommend but I dont really see any difference when no die-electric fittings are used on the hot and cold line. I guess its just a preference. Bubba

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Robert Barr wrote:

I'm not Bubba but I recommended the same thing. My theory, which is completely half baked and unproven, is that a dielectric nipple is plastic lined while a galvanized nipple is, well, galvanized - and therefore the dielectric won't rust/constrict at all during the service life of the assembly. Plus they're about the same price as galv or brass and are hanging there in the little blister packs right next to the hookup lines etc. so why not. That, and it just grates on me to have dissimilar metals connected directly to each other (steel to brass in this case) although I see in Bubba's reply he correctly points out that the brass valve doesn't provide a conductive path to anything (unless your basement floods, then you've got bigger problems <G>)
nate
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mcp6453 wrote:

you'll get a better flush out if you turn the water off, open the drain valve (your hose), then open the t&p valve to vent the tank. After the tank is MT, THEN open your water supply a few seconds at a time to give the bottom a blast. After you're through, then close the drain, the T&P, and proceed with the refill before turning the heater back on.
s
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I don't do mine often enough and there is so much crud in the bottom that it just clogs the drain valve. I've had to take the lower element out (turn the power off first) and use that as an access hole to poke a stick in and bust up the crud. I've had crud so high it cut off most of the water around the lower element causing it to burn up - which is what first got me going on cleaning out the crud. I think since I turned the temp down I've had a lot less build up.
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Ashton Crusher wrote:
> I think

AND a lot less hot water.......
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On Sun, 15 Feb 2009 15:05:13 -0600, Steve Barker

Me thinks someone likes long hot powerful showers regardless of the cost. :-) Me, I used to. Then 4 women, 1 at a time showed up. Between them, the dishwasher and the washing machine, I just gave up. Turned down the water pressure, set the water heater at 120 and installed low flow shower heads. Still have to keep an eye on it. No one seems to understand why you cant take a shower, then start the dishwasher and washing machine at the same time while the next person hops in the shower. It was either deal with it my way or install a 100 gal water heater or an instantaneous heater. Bubba
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Bubba wrote:

This is why I like my gas water heater - I can do all that stuff sequentially and it still comes out scalding hot. Only if I try to run two appliances simultaneously and/or do laundry or run the diswasher while taking a shower does the water temp. drop off. No electrics for me, thanks.
nate
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most gas water heaters are a wimpy 30,000 BTU or even less.
my tank is 75,000 BTUs 50- gallons with shower head flow restrictor removed.
provides basically unlimited hot water
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

75,000 in a water heater!?!!??? ya, oooooookay... LMAO!!
s
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it does a wonderful job espically in the winter when incoming water is ice cold.
with 2 washing machines, dishwasher, shower etc its nice to always have enough water.
i tend to get a shower then take laundry to basement and in washer.
by the time i finish showering dry off and get dressed the water heaters burner is just turning off.
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with 2 washing machines, dishwasher, shower etc its nice to always have enough water.
********************************************
We use cold water wash for most things and it works very well with the new detergents. Whites still get hot though.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

that all sounds great, but washing clothes rarely requires hot water. Only on some whites.
s
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wrote:

I use warm or hot, I repair machines for a living. oil etc on clothes.
cold water in winter here around 40 degrees, way too cold to do laundry the soap doesnt dissolve
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Bubba wrote:

well as far as our particular household is concerned, the wash is during the day, the dishwash after supper, and the showers in the am. don't see the conflict at all. We do just fine on a 50 gal with 2 kids and now that it's just the two of us, a 40 does just fine. It IS however still set on about 150 degrees where it needs to be for proper dishwashing and conservation.
s
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Steve Barker wrote:

For dishwashing, the difference between 72 and 150 is nil.
150 is not hot enough to kill bacteria and 72 will be heated to the proper temperature by the dishwasher anyway.
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HeyBub wrote:

not all dishwashers do that and even if they do only if you put them on the 'sanitize' setting.
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On Sun, 15 Feb 2009 22:11:34 -0600, Steve Barker

Wrong again, junior. Most all have them now. Try to find any new one that doesnt. I set mine on regular wash. If the water isnt hot enough, the display shows "Hot" and goes into a hold cycle till it gets there. The sanatize cycle is completly different. Bubba
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On Sun, 15 Feb 2009 19:00:33 -0600, Steve Barker

I guess you havent read this: The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) urges all users to lower their water heaters to 120 degrees Fahrenheit. In addition to preventing accidents, this decrease in temperature will conserve energy and save money.
Most adults will suffer third-degree burns if exposed to 150 degree water for two seconds. Burns will also occur with a six-second exposure to 140 degree water or with a thirty second exposure to 130 degree water. Even if the temperature is 120 degrees, a five minute exposure could result in third-degree burns.
By the way......dishwashers have their own heaters in them to bring the dishwashing water up to the proper temperatuer. Bubba
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