Electric vs. Gas, your opinion ?????

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Hi All,
Due to the high costs of gas this winter I am considering changing to all electric on my stove and mainly heating unit.
Do you think this is a good idea ????
J
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Does it get below freezing for much of the winter, where you live ? What's the cost of electric and gas there ?
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

It usually gets below freezing about 20-30 days out of the year. Not sure of prices but the gas as compared to last winter has doubled but not electric.
J
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An air-source (electric) heat pump MIGHT be worth considering in your case.

I predict you'll soon see the price of NG decline significantly due to the unusually mild winter. I believe the price is already falling in many areas.
I just swapped-out my natural draft furnace for a "92.8%" efficient, condensing gas furnace. Check back in a year or so but, after "living" with the new furnace for only three weeks, I suspect my gas bill will go DOWN noticeably despite rate increases.
I recommend that you stay with natural gas for your space heating.
--
:)
JR

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In my opiniion, yes. My reasoning is that gas is going to continue to be a scares product in the future. Electricity will naturally increase in cost also but not to the level of hydocabon fuels. Most electricity is producedby either atomic,water or coal and all of those are very much available. Therefore electriic should remain at a fair cost level. I live in Tennesse in a mobile home, all electric, Highest bill this winter $125.00. What was yours?
jack
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snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net wrote:

Coal - 49.8% Nuclear - 19.9% Natural Gas - 17.9% Hydroelectric - 6.5% Sunbeams - 2.3%

Do you get power from the socialist TVA?
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<rj>
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snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net wrote:

Jack,
I'm in SW Georgia and my last bill was $275.00, more than half of that was just gas. The electric has not risen that much from last year, only the gas.
J
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With out knowing the cost of each fuel, and a host of other factors there no one could possibly GUESS if it was a good idea or not.
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Probably not.
The cost of the change over, especially for a stove, may be far more than the potential savings. Gas went up, but electric has to in most areas. We have 20% increase. Your stove probably uses $100 of gas in a year and a replacement will be $500 to $100 including wiring. You may save $20 a year. Rather poor payback.
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Edwin Pawlowski wrote:

The stove it not really the issue, it's just if I do away with gas that has to be changed out. Heating is the issue and my bills this winter have doubled--ouch.
J
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Joey wrote:

Unless you have a very high connect fee, why do away with gas totally?
--
Joseph Meehan

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I was wondering if I would replace my gas furnace with a heat pump, but they just announced a 72% rate increase here for electricity starting in July (despite the fact that we get over 90% of our electricity from nuclear and coal around here). Makes me wonder if a heat pump would really work for me next winter...
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

The numbers can be run to give you a good idea of what the usage would be for a "standard" year and if you choose an expected cost over the next ten years or so, you should be able to do the math and figure out the best bet. The real problem is unless you have some very cheap gas or electric and little chance of it changing, you will always have some chance of guessing wrong.
Good Luck.
72% increase - That's not nice.
--
Joseph Meehan

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Did you verify that with your supplier? I don't see why you can't just cap off the gas line to the existing hear and keep the stove and any other appliances you have.
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Joey wrote:

If your electric and gas rates are anything like mine, it would get even worse with electric heating.
Where I live (in New Jersey), electricity costs 3.6 times as much as gas, per BTU consumed.
Regards,
Mark
p.s. to compare rates, you'll need to know the conversion factors. Our electric bill shows energy use in kW-hours. Our gas bill shows energy usage in terms of "therms". Multiply your electric rate (given in dollars per kW-hour) times 29.3, this will give your electric rate in dollars per therm, which you can compare directly to the gas rate.
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wrote:

IMVSO the broilers on electric stoves don't get as hot as the ones on gas stoves, and broiled meat, especially the fat on broiled meat, is never as crisp and bubbly as I would like it, unless I keep the meat in there so long that the meat is too well done.
This might have an effect on the skin on chicken too, I'm not sure.
It takes the top burners and probably the baking oven also longer to heat up, but I really don't care about that. I just keep in mind that the food won't be ready for an extra 30 or 60 seconds for the top burners, or 2 or 3 minutes or whatever for the oven. The end result is the same.
If the effect on broiling matters to you, I'd suggest cooking at someone else's home for a while and see if your experience is like mine.
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Joey wrote:

You need to start by checking out local cost of gas and electric.
98.48% if the time you will find that even at the highest price of gas last winter (around here it came down in January and further down in February) gas is still cheaper for heat than electric. The fact is electric is generated by gas in may parts of the country. Electric prices have also been going up.
Now if you add in the cost of new equipment, it is almost certain you will end up paying more not less.
Take a deep breath and say to yourself, I know prices are going up and that I will pay more for heating. I will promise myself that I will do all that I can to conserve all forms of energy. OK breath and move on. :-)
--
Joseph Meehan

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You MUST remember lots of electric is generated by burning gas, or nuclear. both of these are high cost and rising. just last sunday I saw a article that nationwide electric rates will soar this summer.
If you go ahead and convert check just the costs for rewiring:( Probably a new service entrance, new wiring for stove and furnace, what were your plans for your hot water heater?
Figure on DOUBLING the size of the tank because electric is so poor at heating water and costly too. If you live in a hard water area expect to replace the electric heating elements every few years as they corrode. a real pain in butt...
Consertively all this will probably cost you $10,000
You would be far better off investing that in a more efficent gas furnace, insulation, condensing hot water tank and things like caulking. get your home pressure tested looking for leaks. most of these last a lifetime and will pay off no matter what heat you use.
heck you could get one of those outdoor furnaces that burn wood they move the heat indoors in a super insulated pipe.
the trouble is the cost of firewood.
I have a friend, his family used to work all summer cutting hauling and moving firewood bragged about the big savings:)
Till I asked how many hours of work this was in comparison the cost of gas.
Their efforts were saving them about $2.50 per hour:(
They would of been better off working a minimum wage job!
today they still burn some wood for the cozy feeling but quit trying to heat their home.
the economies of scale by big plants and infrastructure overwhelm individuals ability to do things...:(
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

What about the loss of energy when transmitting through electrical cables? Vs. gas which I don't believe looses mcuh energy in its transmission?
--
Thank you,



"Then said I, Wisdom [is] better than strength: nevertheless the poor
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