electric costs

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harryagain wrote:

Except here in Canada, where we use the ultra-safe Candu reactor design, of which there are several in operation in other countries like India and China.
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Most of the differences in energy prices between the US and Europe has to do with MUCH higher taxes.
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wrote:

We also get a lot more hydro power and our natural gas is pretty cheap. Europeans are just used to expensive energy so the government can load on the taxes. German solar power has been estimated at 55 euro cents (~75 cents US) a KWH with about half of that showing up in other taxes.
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On 8/4/2011 4:30 PM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

We can't expect harryagain to understand this. Too bad we also have a lot like him here.
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We also have hydro power and cheap natural gas. However, like you the cheap natural gas is running out. The Russians have lots. They are just biding their time.
I can see you are not clever enough to grasp the scale of the problem. Things will go on as before eh? I don't think so.
Today is Armageddon day by the way.
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We only pay 8% tax on domestic fuel. (Nat. gas/electricity.) And you will be paying more tax too in order to finance your rich people. Fuel is ans obvious target, also it is imported It will compel you to be economic instead of so wastefull as you are now.
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That would certainly seem more cost effective to install there.
Greg
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It is a government (scocialist;-) scheme. I don'tknow how the economics would be in the USA.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Feed-in_tariffs_in_the_United_Kingdom
It wasn't cheap. I get a 12% return on capital. No point leaving your money to rot in the bank these days.
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harryagain wrote:

But the money you spent for your panels, invertors and grid-tie will never be recouped in the remainder of your lifetime.
So your net electricity cost is higher than anyone else posting here.
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I get a 12% return on capital.
How is that worse than leaving it in the bank to rot when inflation is over 3% and the best return is 2% in the bank here?
My electricity bill is cut by almost a half too, (I have to use some at night andin bad weather when the panelo is not working.)
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harryagain wrote:

Since you're in the UK, your geographic latitude and your climate (cloudy a fair bit is my assumption) means that you've either spent a fortune on panels (and ergo you have a large house and/or property and/or you've cut down all your trees), or you take great pains in your personal / home life to use as little electricity as possible. Or some combination thereof.
It's still not a bargain that on balance makes much sense.

But at what cost? To you? In terms of lifestyle? In terms of up-front capital?

You did not speak to that point.

Highly unlikely.
Assuming you've spent a conservative $50,000 (US dollars) for your PV system, in order to generate a 12% return ($6k per year) the panels would have to supply you with the equivalent of $500 per month.
Are you factoring in the cost of maintainence and repair? Invertors are expensive and don't last forever.
What does your electricity utility pay you for the power you feed into their system? For how many years are you garanteed that rate?

Again, based on your climate and geography, you must take great pains to live a spartan life, conserving every last bit of electricity in order to make that claim.
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Here in NJ I'm paying about 18c/kwh
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My distribution and transmission cost is about 2.9 cents, where theirs is 6.6 cents.
Greg
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I just found out on tonight's news, the 6.6 cent company is solely a distribution company. No wonder. They used to generate. They also owned the plant near my house.
The news was a new wind generation company offering reduced rates.
Greg
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wrote:

Standard practice int he UK. I buy/sell electricity to "British Gas". They buy wholesale & sell it on.
Generation, distribution and sales is all different companies here.
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In spewed forth:

directly from my bill North Tx
Electric Service
RKWH : Residential Energy.......... 4,296.00 0.08600 $369.46
The average price you paid for electricity this month is 8.787 per kWh.
this includes all surcharges and taxes
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wrote Re electric costs:

$0.115/kwh just north of Cullman Alabama.
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$.08/kWh = everything except garbage.
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I'd happily pay that bill if you pay mine. Our rate here totals about 18¢. Of that 10¢ is generation, the rest distribution and other charges.
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gregz wrote:

Here in a mid-sized city in Ontario (Canada) where the electricity provider is a city-owned company, the raw cost is 6.8 cents for the first 600 kwh, then 7.9 cents for anything above that. The "delivery" charge seems to amount to 3.5 cents per kwh. A few other charges (one of which is sales tax) typically amounts to an additional $10 to $20.
My last bill said I used 1274 kwh (according to the meter). An "adjustment factor" of 1.0409 is applied to that number (supposedly to account for line losses) and that results in a billed usage of 1326 kwh. For that I paid a grand total of $165, which equates to a cost of 12.4 cents per kwh.
These are Canadian dollars and cents, which for the better part of the past year or three are at least exactly equivalent to (if not 2 to 5% more valuable than) US dollars and cents.
This billing period is actually from mid-june to mid-july. I expect my next bill to be about the same. This is about double the amount of electricity I used in May or October (my two lowest-usage months). My climate is pretty much the same as Chicago, Detroit, Toronto, Buffalo or Cleveland.
I have my thermostat set for no higher than 74F during this time, and my 36-year-old furnace fan is running at least 75% of the time during this billing period. I'd say that for 25% of this time-frame, my thermostat is set for 72F, and the other 75% of the time it's set at 74F.
Is anyone putting all this info posted in this thread into a spread sheet?
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