Drywall Texturing Question....

Has anyone here ever *roller textured* drywall using a mixture of joint compound and paint?
I had a couple drywaller/finishers/handymen come out to bid this job (floating my living room walls and ceiling) and neither of them wanted to mess with it. One of the *pros* suggested this technique w/ the mud and paint - assuming that I didn't want to re-hang my sheetrock - and I'm just curious how well it holds up.
Is this something that I'm going to have to redo a couple years down the road? Or will it stand the test of time?
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Very standard approach. Called "roller stipple" here, requires a bit of care during application to avoid roller ridges, globs, etc to provide a pleasant ever texture. You can get slight variations based on length of roller nap - longer will give a heavier texture.
I know of installs well over 30 years old with no adverse cautions.
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On 19-May-2007, DanGwrote:

Thanks for your reply, Dan. And for all the info.
I ran across your primer on *roller stippling* a few months back (see below). Unfortunately, I've seen very little else on this technique -- either online or in print. In fact, had you not mentioned it here, I doubt I would have heard anything about it.
Why is that? Is it just not talked about in polite company? ; ))

* * * Use about equal parts of paint and ready mix joint compound. Get a long nap roller cover, 3/4 minimum - 1" plus preferred. The paint can be any old latex junk or mismatch you have or buy. Keep the paint in a 5 gallon bucket, not a roller tray. Lay down plenty of tarps, use an extension handle on the roller frame, wear old clothes. Dunk the roller into the 5, bang it back and forth on the sides of the bucket to shed excess, roll onto the wall. Once the wall has a full wet coat, work at getting a uniform texture without blobs and ridges.
The texture is often called "roller stipple". * * *
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Just out of curiosity... if you let it set just a little, could you knock it down with a trowel to give it more dimension?
Kate O|||||||O
On 19-May-2007, DanGwrote:

Thanks for your reply, Dan. And for all the info.
I ran across your primer on *roller stippling* a few months back (see below). Unfortunately, I've seen very little else on this technique -- either online or in print. In fact, had you not mentioned it here, I doubt I would have heard anything about it.
Why is that? Is it just not talked about in polite company? ; ))

* * * Use about equal parts of paint and ready mix joint compound. Get a long nap roller cover, 3/4 minimum - 1" plus preferred. The paint can be any old latex junk or mismatch you have or buy. Keep the paint in a 5 gallon bucket, not a roller tray. Lay down plenty of tarps, use an extension handle on the roller frame, wear old clothes. Dunk the roller into the 5, bang it back and forth on the sides of the bucket to shed excess, roll onto the wall. Once the wall has a full wet coat, work at getting a uniform texture without blobs and ridges.
The texture is often called "roller stipple". * * *
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