drywall over plaster ceiling


I have a couple rooms where the old plaster ceilings are stained, cracked, etc. - I am thinking the easiest thing to do might be to just have a layer of drywall put over them. (note - yes I have fixed the roof leak that led to the stains etc.) There's no cove molding or anything to worry about; I think the half inch less headroom would not be an issue. I'll probably have pros do it and just do the painting myself. Just wondering if anyone has done this, did it work OK, etc.
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What will the drywall be fastened into, the lath behind the plaster?
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wrote:

IF it were me I would go over the old ceiling with 5/8 sheetrock...It is much stronger and stiffer and will look alot flater..Under no circumstances use 1/4 inch...1/2 inch MINIMUM...Screw the rock to the joists with 2 1/2 inch screws...Don't be afraid to poke a few holes in the old ceiling to find the joists and then snap lines on the old ceiling with a chaulk line...Agree you should get a pro....Have done it many , many times......Good luck....
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On 10/20/2009 11:28 AM Heathcliff spake thus:

Yes, and no need to use 1/2" drywall. Get the 1/4" stuff; much easier to work with.
--
Found--the gene that causes belief in genetic determinism

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This is sarcasm, right? Or have you never tried to use 1/4" overhead? I'm old & weak but wouldn't use anything less than 1/2" on a ceiling. [and I doubt I'd try to make it look good over anything but a really good lathe/plaster ceiling. One that was so good I'd likely just patch it anyway] I've always used 2x4 deadmen & worked alone-- maybe a crew and sheetrock lift would make1/4" feasible.
If the OP is calling a pro-- then hopefully the pro will talk him out of foolishness-- and it doesn't matter what anyone here thinks.
Jim
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On 10/20/2009 12:59 PM Jim Elbrecht spake thus:

Read the OP's message again, carefully. This is going over an existing plaster ceiling; stained, but presumably otherwise in good condition. So why would you *not* want to use 1/4" drywall? By the way, I have done this, and it works fine.
And also by the way, it's "lath". Lathe is a rotary machine.
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Price the stuff out. 1/4 cost way more than 1/2 or 3/8. Plus the hassle of getting it up there without breaking it.
No way I would use 1/4 on a ceiling and I can't lift crap anymore.
Colbyt
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I left the whole thing so *you* could" Read the OP's message again, carefully.".

Except for the "cracked, etc." part. If it was just stained, I'm guessing he'd paint it.

Aside from the extra cost, it is damn near impossible to work with because it breaks so easy. It is also a lot more unforgiving when going over a less than perfect backer- nails pull through- it waves.

So shoot me.
Jim
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It will work fine if the dw is screwed to ceiling joists. Some future potential problems if it is only screwed to the lath.
It is quite often easier to add cheap furring strips across the joists at a perfect 16" OC so that the seams all line up properly with the drywall. The 1.25" will never be missed. Back in those days 16" OC was approximate.
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On Tue, 20 Oct 2009 11:28:44 -0700 (PDT), Heathcliff

I see nothing wrong doing this. You may need to reset the ceiling light electrical box such that the edge comes to the ceiling surface, or buy an electrical extension. Also, find the joists. Ceiling drywall needs more screws than when installed on a wall. Strange as it may be, drywall has a "grain" and is stronger lengthwise than crosswise. I've done drywall ceilings, it is not difficult, stilts help.
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Probably a dumb idea, but..........
would you consider another layer of plaster instead?
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I wouldn't recommend stilts for a DIYer first-timer. He'll put his eye out.*
R
*Jean Shepard reference.
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On Tue, 20 Oct 2009 18:55:58 -0700 (PDT), RicodJour

No but it is fun to watch two "drywallers" run a 40 yard dash at lunch time with stilts on.
BTDT, saw it first hand...
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Heathcliff wrote:

a heavy coat of knockdown texture works well also. Then paint with semigloss white. They look beautiful.
s
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You could take 2x4's and make a frame for the drywall to be screwed into.
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On 10/23/2009 11:30 AM Dymphna spake thus:

Sure, but why in the world would you want to do that when furring strips (1x2x) would be more than sufficient?
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True , but if you're going through all that you might as well rip down the old ceiling and do it right...

No...As the old plaster ceiling continues to fall apart structually underneath the new drywall the load could get quite heavy...Besides strapping will follow the sags in the old ceiling....
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Comment about ripping down the old?
1) In favour of the motion: Get rid of rough surface, unevenness, possibly sagging etc. Easier to screw/nail brand new drywall ceiling to correctly spaced furring strips etc. It may also be possible/ advantageous to install vapour barrier and/heat or sound insulation? 2) Against the motion. Don't know what's up there over the ceiling. Old dirt and insulation may fall through and need replacing/upgrading. Major mess and clean up to tear down ceiling. More 'stuff' to get rid of. More time and cost? Any existing electrical fixtures/wiring in ceiling may need slight modification?
Th discussion about what thickness drywall to use to ensure a flat/ smooth good looking job would seem rather minor; especially if professionals with all the right gear are going to do the work and can recommend .
Good luck with project.
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