Drip edge installation for eaves vs rakes?

Doing a new garage roof.
I noticed at Lowes that they have several different drip edges. Is there supposed to be a different one for the rake than for the eaves? Also, does the drip edge install right up against the sheathing? or should there be a little bit of a gap. I have 5/8 sheathing and assume standard 1" drip edge. The type F is the standard for eaves I think, but this type B is a wrap around for the gable end from what I could tell--kind of like a 90 degree wrap.
What is the standard practice?
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I'd always used the same for rake and eave. Just snugged it up against the siding/fascia, not distorting the DE to where it pulls up. Tom
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snipped-for-privacy@mail.com wrote:

Standard or preferred? Too many people skimp on the roof edging, either omitting it entirely or using a poorly chosen profile. This link shows some standard items: http://www.bergerbros.com/products_edgings_dripedge.html The profiles that extend past the fascia by about 1/2" and with the bottom edged kicked out are the best profiles to use at both rake and eave. They're better for a bunch of reasons. The 90 degree bent edges are poor substitutes.
Call a local roofing supply yard - they'll have a wider selection and of better products than you'll find at a big box store.
R
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The 10 year-old roof on my house has no drip edge on the eaves, but the bottom layer of architectural asphalt shingles hangs over the eave by about 1". The bottom edge just dangles over the gutter. There's no snow here, only rain (Berkeley, CA). Is this a reasonable/adequate practice? Would adding a drip edge underneath the bottom row of the shingles be feasible/beneficial?
Thanks, Wayne
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In a previous post Wayne Whitney wrote...

Yes. If the bottom of the drip edge is below the top of the gutter, then you won't get wind blown rain behind the fascia. My house does not have drip edge flashing and on a 2:12 pitch the water runs back under the roofing and down behind the fascia.
I didn't install the roof and curse the SOB who did every time it rains.
--
Bob Morrison, PE, SE
R L Morrison Engineering Co
  Click to see the full signature.
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Ah, pitch, I should mention my roof is an 8:12 pitch (I believe), it is just about the steepest I think is OK to walk on.
How is the drip edge normally attached to the roof deck? How can I attach it to the roof deck when the first row of shingles is already in place? The shingles are presumably only nailed at the midline, so I should be able to lift the bottom half up to slide in a drip edge, but I don't think there would be enough clearance to nail it.
Wayne
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8-in-12 is NOT okay to walk on (without a safety net). A 6 pitch is even worse, because you don't think you even need a safety net. The DE goes on first. Only tacked in a few places. Let it play straight. Then the starter course is laid on top of the DE. Place your fasteners through the starter course and into the DE. If you've already laid your starter course and can still fit the DE under, good. The instructions are on every bundle, by the way. Tom
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Sorry, Mr. Whitney, I now realize that you aren't the OP. If the starter course was fastened properly, you probably won't be able to slip the DE up and under. But if you can, then all you'll need is a fastener about every couple/few feet to secure it. Mind that they're placed where they won't see any water from the course above. Tom
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"Wayne Whitney" wrote

The problem with installing a factory drip-edge now, is the shingles won't overhang the drip edge. Shingles should overhang drip-edge, 3/4" to 1". I've seen my share of jobs, where water run back infiltrated and came in through windows, because whomever installed the covering, ran starters & btm. course flush with the drip.
A corrective action can be done, but unless you're willing to start from the beginning, you have to compromise. To correct jobs like I explained, a 3" strip can be cut and slid under the starter course, it must be off set so butt ends are not aligned with starter. It is held in place with dabs of Karnak, allowing a 1" exposed overhang. This creates a slight _hump_ at the bottom, and may not be feasible for low pitched roofs.
The preferred method, is having a real roofer, which has a brake, custom bend drip-edge from coil stock. You will not get the _F_ channel, but instead an _L_ channel drip-edge. He can make the lips of the _L_, as long as needed. Bends & reverse bends are placed to stiffen the drip-edge, with a kick-out of 1/4" away from the fascia.
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<snip>

Rico, So the preferred ones from your link would be F-Styles: FA 1/2, F5 & FSN4 1/2? What would be your choice for a shingled roof with gutters? For a tiled roof with no gutters, no fascia except 1x2 nailed on plywood edge?
TIA
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Diane wrote:

Tile roofs are pretty scarce around here, and I've never worked on one. I'm not sure if the roof edge requirements are different for them. The F 4 1/2 is a good all around choice. The only time that the gutters would come into play is if the fascia was narrow and the gutter guy went with a simple way of hanging them. The height that a gutter is supposed to be held down from the extended plane of the shingles is dependent on the slope and your local conditions. It's held down mainly to allow snow and ice to slide off, so that may not be a concern where you are.
R
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I believe the "wrap around" drip edge is used more for just shingling over old shingles...because it hides the edge of the old shingles and drip edge. At least that is what I use it for.....
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IMHO, they should outlaw the B channel. Water will follow that bend right back into the fascia. Again, IMHO, B channel is made for those who want to take a short cut at your expense. They don't like trimming edges of existing shingles, so they cover them up, which creates problems which aren't noticed until they're long gone.
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josh wrote:

Whatever roof edging you choose, the bottom edge should have a kicked out lip. That makes the water drip free from the fascia instead of running down it, prevents capillary action from pulling water up under a flush piece of edging, and, most important, makes it easy to repaint. The tip of the brush will run up behind that kicked out lip and there won't be any exposed edge-of-paint-film. Makes cutting in a snap.
R
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How does this kicked out lip interface with the gutters? It seems like with a narrow fascia, there wouldn't be room to mount gutters below the bottom edge of the drip edge.
Cheers, Wayne
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The backside of the gutter can be slipped up under the DE easily. Tom
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so is the DE supposed to be fitted hard against the fascia, or should there be a gap? And should it be nailed down every 24"?
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Just snugged up to it. Don't distort the profile. Tom
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