drilling aluminum

I want to drill some 7/8" holes in some 1/4" thick aluminum.
I was planning on using a hole saw, but then found I had a 7/8" masonry drill. Would that work, or is the hole saw a better bet?
Do I lubricate the surface, or just cut dry?
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If it's metal-cutting hole saw, yes. But a twist drill is even better.

No need to lubricate. Won't hurt. But it isn't necessary.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Toller wrote:

of course a metal bit would work like a charm
but i owuld try the hole saw first
i feel like a mason bit would only superheat that area and weaken that area if it even cut / it might work
you got a 7/8 mason bit? dang, that's a farily hefty bit, and we all know the tip can be sharp.. it might get you through 1/4" maybe drilli from both sides..
I woiuldn't worry bout no oil, or cooling the bit but a splash of water on the metal might keep it from getting to hot if your bits are dull
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If your bits are dull,then either sharpen them or get new ones.
--
Jim Yanik
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Jim Yanik wrote:

don't yell at me bitch
im not the one drilling with shitty blades
lol
maaaaaaaaaaa hahahahahaha
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sosessyithurts wrote:

Nope. You're the one drilling your cat.
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THIS IS "YELLING",UseNet fashion.
and nobody drills with -blades-.They use drill BITS.
--
Jim Yanik
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Toller wrote:

For cutting aluminum a twist, hole saw, spade bit or forstner bitt will work.....I've used all of these with good results. Any cutting tool (carbide preferred) that gives decent results with wood can be used with success in aluminum (slow, steady feed & sharp tool)
Luckily your material is not that thick.
If your work piece is held down well, clamped or fixed to soemthing, just have at it. Only the twist drill would need a smaller pilot. The hole saw, spade bit &
A masonry bit is not a good choice, they're meant for brittle materails, esp if it is a bit for a rotary hammer
If the choice is masonry bit or hole saw.......use the hole saw.
cheers Bob
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Toller wrote:

aluminum.
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Hole saw. Dry. High speed, low feed pressure. Stop occasionally to clear out the groove, shop vac works nicely.
Masonry bit definitely not the right device.
--

Christopher A. Young
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Hole saw, WD-40 for lube, medium speed if available, stop for nothing other than going to the next hole, many holes put a piece of wood or another piece of aluminum under the bit if in a drill press so you don't have a big burr or an airplane prop on the spindle of a drill press. 30 year machinist if that makes a difference.
Rich

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