Does Locktite work on plastic

I got a bathtub handle that keeps falling off. The cartridge is some sort of plastic and a long 3" screw goes into it. But long or not, the plastic si stripped so the handle falls off all the time. I plan to replace the cartridge as soon as I can find out what the brand if this faucet is, and then locate one. It's got no markings on it, and then I will still have trouble finding the thing in this rural area. In the meantime, I am looking for something to keep the handle on. I put some of that heavy pink teflon tape on the screw and it helps a little but the screw still turns forever. I was wondering about locktite. Does it work on plastics? Of course, I do want to be able to remove the handle in the future too.
Anyone ever tried this or have another idea? I dont want to use a larger screw because that may split it, and then I'm really screwed.
Thanks
Mark
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no loctite. install visegrips to use shower. if hot then foam pipe insulation to cover hot visegrip. plan on inconveniencing home occupants by turning off water supply to tub when taking parts to town to compare them. see also www.hdsupply.com for an overwhelming amount of handles and stems. or find your nearest plumber, those old timers often recognize the old parts and have a much faster repair for you.
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snipped-for-privacy@UNLISTED.com wrote:

Stick some wooden toothpicks in the hole then insert screw.
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dadiOH
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You might try packing the hole with an epoxy compound or even auto body putty. Then, drill and tap.
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On Tue, 06 Dec 2005 06:30:37 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@UNLISTED.com wrote:

Try a slightly longer screw. There might be some threads left that you are not reaching.
Commodore Joe Redcloud
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snipped-for-privacy@UNLISTED.com wrote:

Liquid Loctite softens and removes many paints, so I'd check before using it on any important plastic parts.
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On 6-Dec-2005, snipped-for-privacy@UNLISTED.com wrote:

Loctite works on threads - which you've stripped. It doesn't bridge a gap very well.
If you can't get a replacement part, I like the suggestion to pack the hole and tap with a new thread.
Mike
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On Tue, 06 Dec 2005 06:30:37 -0600, snipped-for-privacy@UNLISTED.com wrote:

I agree about using a toothpick or two. Round. If it's real crowded in there, use a flat toothpick or two, a wooden kitchen match, or one split lengthwise.

minute epoxy and put the screw in when it hadn't hardened yet. If there isn't a lot of force on the screw, and it's not too wet, and you want to make it easy to get the screw out later, Ambroid Cement, available only at hobby stores, I think. Dries quickly, except I guess maybe not so fast in your case where there won't be any air around it.

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