Do cellular shades really provide better insulation than regular blinds?

Hello,
I need to buy some new window shades or blinds for my bedroom. I'm considering cellular and faux wood. All the web sites claim that the cellular shades insulate much better than regular type blinds.
Does anyone have any real experience with the cellular shades or knowledge of them? Thanks,
Jason
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I have insulated double honeycomb cellular shades installed in houses in Florida and Massachusetts. In both houses, there was a noticeable difference in the temperature once the shades were installed. The double honeycomb design keeps the AC in in Florida, and the cold out, in Massachusetts. So yes, spend the money on good, insulated honeycomb shades with the highest e-value rating you can find. Cheap honeycomb shades that aren't rated for insulation value (without a posted e value) are probably nothing more than decorative, though.
HTH,
Donna
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Or R-value, even. :)
Donna
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Warning that insulating blinds in a winter climate will keep some of the heat in but they will allow the glass to cool down to below the dew point. The blinds will not stop moisture in the air from migrating to the glass and condensing. The result can be water or ice on the glass and water below the window, in the wall and on the floor resulting in damage and/or moulds and possibly some rot --- ask me how I know.

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EXT wrote:

Yup. And in the summer, you get a far better result from preventing the sun from hitting the glass and creating the radiant heat load in the first place.
--
Dave
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Hi Donna,
Thanks for your response. What did you have in the windows before the cellular shades?
Jason
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Ummm... let me think. In Florida, we had roll-down shades and sheers. In Massachusetts we had those narrow vinyl miniblinds, mostly. If it helps, both houses have mid-range double-paned high r-value windows, so the energy loss wasn't remarkable to begin with. But adding the cellular shades definitely made a difference in both cases. For both houses, we went through empire carpets for the blinds. You won't save any money that way, but they do a nice job of installing, and the shades that they sell are excellent quality (hunter douglas). The largest shade that we had made for the 8x10 slider in the Florida house is now going on seven years (three years of use by tenants, no less) and has held up beautifully. Not a single problem. So I have to recommend Hunter Douglass.
HTH,
Donna
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Oh, I forgot - in the living room in Mass we also had those wooden half-blinds. They didn't do much to keep out the cold (they were half blinds) and they were a pain in the ass to get all the dust out of every little ridge and blind. I used to like them, before I had to dust them regularly. :) They are pretty, however.
Donna
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Absolutely. I have outfitted all of my windows and sliders with the double-cell honeycomb shades and the difference is tremendous. And (if you can stomach shopping at the Borg), the cost for a set of Bali insulating shades is barely more than some decent wood/faux-wood blinds. They've paid for themselves in heating and cooling cost savings many times over.

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Thanks,
What did you have in your windows before the cellular shades?
Thanks,
Jason
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I've got unlined and lined cellular shades. Both varieties seem to provide good insulation. It's a bit subjective but in the winter, the surface of the shade is warmer than the adjacent wall so I'm assuming the window & shade combination has better R value than the wall. Since the window is about R 3 and the wall should be about R 7, I'm assuming the shades are about R 4.
Like I said, it's subjective and my "touch test" is not foolproof at all. Heck I could be fooled just because the drywall has a higher heat capacity than the shade's material. All that said, I don't feel colder near the windows.
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just put 'em in here in texas...outside temps in the 90's...
made a HELLUVA difference in the front bedroom...before we put the shades in, it was very warm even with AC on.
now it's very, very comfortable. computer sits near front window and was difficult to use because of the heat. now i have no problem at all.
they definitely work
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