Discharge sump pump into same drain as kitchen sink and laundry tub?

In my basement near a corner there is a 1 1/2 pvc pipe running down the wall from the upstairs kitchen. The laundry tub is also tied into this same pipe and they flow to the right into the sewer. On the far left of the basement is my sump pump. I want to discharge the water to the same spot. It would be about 30 feet. Where the pipe from the pump would enter is about 20" high. Do i need a special slope to angle the water towards the drain? Can it be level? I will have a check valve on it. Is this against some kind of code? Is this enough info? Want any more questions? Thanks . This group is great and lots of help.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tying a sump pump to a sewer line is a major code violation and also risks backing up your entire sewer system. I'd find somewhere else to route the sump pump.
chrisc wrote:

Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

*I don't know where you live, but in New Jersey it is illegal to have a sump pump discharge into a sanitary sewer line. Apparently in so doing it would add more volume and consequently more expense to sewer treatment plants.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The big issue with the extra volume isn't the expense -- it's simply the extra volume. Dumping rainwater into a sanitary sewer can easily overwhelm it. And if this happens, the inevitable result is raw sewage in rivers and streams.
Don't do it.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mar 17, 8:03 pm, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

.
Some would say extra volume does equal extra expense. A facility only has the capacity to process X amount of sewage water per day. If it gets more than that, you need another plant. Plus, there are chemicals involved too, aren't there?

Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
paanmc had written this in response to http://www.thestuccocompany.com/maintenance/Re-Discharge-sump-pump-into-same-drain-as-kitchen-sink-and-364518-.htm :
I live in Ohio and it's also illegal around here to discharge a sump pump into a sanitary sewer line. I suspect it's like that is most places. I know one home owner who had a shady plumber do this for him, and while it when a long time without being noticed, when it was found out (when later work was done, but would also have been a problem if selling the house). Don't try to tie your sump in to the sewer. You'll want to run a line outside for the sump. You can discharge away from the foundation, like to a dry well (many like that in our neighborhood) or you might be able to run a line down to the street (or tie into the downspouts if they already run that way - that's the way our house is). This might be limited by local rules. ------------------------------------- snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

##-----------------------------------------------## Delivered via http://www.thestuccocompany.com/ Building Construction and Maintenance Forum Web and RSS access to your favorite newsgroup - alt.home.repair - 347424 messages and counting! ##-----------------------------------------------##
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Apr 1, 10:37 pm, paanmc_at_yahoo_dot snipped-for-privacy@foo.com (paanmc) wrote:

.=
The few houses in my neighborhood that have sump pumps also have drainage fields around there basement. The sump pump is tied to theh drainage field and it goes from there to the curb to run down to the storm sewer.
Jimmie
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes. First thing to do is check if it's allowed or not. Many places it isn't for the very good reason John cites.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

And if you are allowed, you will need to provide a vent, as the 1 1/2" line is a drain line for the kitchen sink and laundry. Your pump may overtax the lines capacity as well, as the line is probably at its rated limit.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Where I am and most water companies, it would be a big fine the water co said, with an extra charge every day. Call your water co, and plan to run it outside. A big rain can back up sewers and it wont drain out just when you need it. Some areas sewers can back into houses, then you have to have it pump into the yard. Its not worth the risks to drain into a sewer.
Add pictures here
✖
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.