Difference between (DAP) Water Putty and Setting Joint Compound?

The DAP package says: "A premium quality all-purpose patching product for the repair of cracks, holes and defects on interior wood surfaces."
The water putty comes as a dry powder that looks just like the gypsum in setting joint compound. After adding water, it also looks and works just like 20 minute setting joint. The only difference that I have noticed is that it seems to set harder and be more difficult to sand.
So, what is the (official) difference in formulations and properties of "Water Putty" (whether DAP or Durham) vs. standard setting joint compound?
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what does the package say? if not there, the msds will have the differences. what does it say?
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Durabond contains... Plaster of Paris (CaSO4.H2O) >60
Limestone <20
Or Dolomite
Mica <10
Vinyl Alcohol Polymer <5
Attapulgite <5
Crystalline Silica <5
May Contain:
Ethylene Vinyl Acetate Polymer
EASYSAND CONTAINS.....
Plaster of Paris (CaSO4.H2O) 60-70
Limestone <10
Or Dolomite
Expanded Perlite <10
Mica <10
Vinyl Alcohol Polymer <5
Attapulgite <5
Crystalline Silica
Water Putty contains...
Plaster of paris
Calcium carbonate
Silica, crystalline
Bottom line , Joint compound is for sheetrock...The Water Putty is for wood...It's BEST to use the correct product for the job...ESPECIALLY if you are using it for a customer...If shit goes WRONG the manufacturer won't stand behind you and YOU will eat it , so to speak...LOL...If at home and you want to experiment...Go for it...Let us know how it works out...LOL...Hope I helped....
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Well, most of my patching is for old lath & plaster walls around deep/wide cracks, holes or near the old wood corner bead.
I find that the harder setting versions work well in this case (even though they are harder to sand when dry) since they tend to bond together the weak plaster better than a sheetrock joint compound does. In particular, I am now using it to patch around the wood corner bead which is obviously a high stress/high traffic area and needs to be shaped to conform to the rounded edge.
So far, the Wood putty does appear to be signficantly harder than setting joint compound and works well.
Since it is more difficult to sand when dry than joint compound, one trick I use is to come back after 5-10 minutes or so when it is almost hard and run a sponge or wet sanding pad over it. This allows me to gently "wet sand" it just before it totally hardens and leaves me with a rock hard, smooth surface when dry.
Of course, if I am just taping a superficial crack or veneering an area, I use the setting joint compound (even over plaster lath).
By the way regarding "experimenting", on an old house (1/2 of ours is from the 1860's the other half is from the late 1700's), I find that experimenting is typically necessary and even fun!
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Sheetrock Brand Durabond Setting Type Joint Compound will do the same..It is VERY hard and is unsandable..It can even be used to patch CONCRETE inside above grade and can be used as a floor leveler as well...I have used it many times doing the EXACT same thing as you described..In fact I bought 7 bags for a job I'm starting tommorow in an 1800's era house...It will bond to just about anything and is very durable , hence the name Durabond...LOL...It is about 11 bucks for a 25lb. bag at Home depot and comes in a variety of setting times..20,45,90,210..Cheaper than Putty I bet and it's made for the job you're doing...I usually use the Durabond sorta like a basecoat to fill holes and patch cracks then I coat the walls with Sheetrock Brand Easysand Setting Type Joint Compound , sand , scrape it somewhat smooth then skimcoat it once or twice with regular joint compound then sand and prime...Check out the USG website....Good Luck with your project....
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All I know is that with a "20 minute setting" product I have to work really, really fast.
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I can't answer your question but I used to use DAP lightweight spackle to fix cracks, holes and defects on interior wood surfaces to be painted.
Dries fasts, sand easy. -----
- gpsman
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