Demolition debris inside sewer line

I have been doing some major renovations on this property and few days ago I hired a video inspection company to inspect all my sewer lines to make sure they are all ok. I have reconfigured my drains in each bathroom but the 3" main cast iron line was not altered.
The video revealed that there is a lot of corrosion going on with one of the lines (I have three independent lines) coming out of the house that merged after the driveway into the main cleanout). It has a lot of buildup and scales and the shape of the pipe from the inside is no longer circular but more like the inside of a "cave".
One option is to find a way to "rim" out the corroded portions (if it's even possible). The other option suggested by the plumber is to lay a new PVC pipe. This would involve cutting a 72 feet long 8" wide trench along my 4" concrete slab, plus a few laterals to tie in from the three bath, each of those would vary from 4 feet to 8 feet in length. Obviously this is a drastic approach and the most costly approach.
My question is, what is the life expectancy of a cast iron pipe? 25 years? 50 years? 100 years? Mine has been in the ground since 1972 in the hot and humid Miami weather with a high water table, near the ocean so water may have salt.
It is "normal" cast iron pipe (SV) and not XH if that helps.
Thanks,
MC
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Sorry the subject line is misleading. I had another related subject I was going to post and the titles got cross wired.
I have done a video inspection and the camera revealed that some construction debris (tiles, thinset chunks, possible pieces of a toilet bowl) was in my 3" line about 3 feet downstream of the toilet flange. Most likely the demolition crew did not cover up the toilet flange when they worked and things fell in.
Any idea on how I can get them out?
Thanks,
MC
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It does kind of depend on how big the chunks are, what the chunks are made of, and how far you would have to push them. You might try a shop vac to see if you can suck them back up. This would certainly be the very best solution. If this fails you might use a drain king to see about forcing it on to the city main, but you mentioned elsewhere that it might be 75 feet or more.
What did the plumber suggest? There are retriever heads for a plumbers snake, but they would be very dependent on shape and material of debris.
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If you are going to have to replace the sewer lateral, it may be less costly and less difficult to reroute the three pipes and the main lateral so that as little as possible runs the length of the driveway but runs under lawn and only need to angle over to tie into the city owned portion of the run.
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EXT wrote:

Replace the whole thing. Follow the cheapest layout, which may not be the same as what is down there now.
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Why not have a company like Roto Rooter clean out pipes? They also have drain cameras. You should be able to show them your tape and get there opinion.
http://www.rotorooter.com/residential/videocameralineinspection.php
The other option suggested by the plumber is to lay a new PVC

I read on a website that 50 to 100+ years is possible, but it depends on the quality (thickness) of the original pipe. Older pipe was thicker, some newer pipe was made thinner to cut costs.
You could get bids for cleaning and replacement, I'm betting the cleaning would be a lot cheaper.
Cheers, Jim
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Well I already did. Actually had two opinions so far. One suggested replacement, but again, sometimes it's hard to tell if they say what they say becuase it's the real situation, or because they wanted to do the repair work they are recommending. The next one says the pipe has a lot of corrosions and build up and need to be cleaned. However, it's not your normal grease or junk in the pipe, this is "icicles looking" formation on the inside surface of the pipe formed by the corrosion and needs to be cut out with specialized nozzles, which in itself may cut or damage the pipe if not done right. So yes, cleaning is an option, with special nozzle cuts ($1000 minimum for 1 hour), followed by snaking ($300), followed by hudrojet from downstream ($500), followed by video inspection ($600) and then see if I need to replace the line (which by then if I decide to I am already $2500 in the hole). I guess I am between a cast iron pipe and a hard place.

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might be able to clean and put a sock in it, basically relining inside of lines with a plastic material that expands and hardens into seemless liner when filled with very hot water under pressure.
saves digging and restoration
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One additional question...
If I do make a cut in my slab that is 8" wide, and 72 feet long (a straight cut), how would this affect the structural integrity of my monolithic slab?
I heard of VAC-CON or Core Drilling as methods to create holes underground, are those applicable methods here for residential 3" line? but then again, I don't know where other utilities are there are other deck drain and water supply lines under the house.
MC
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If the existing driveway is in good condition without cracks or any serious note, not much. I'd get it over with, cut the driveway, run the line(s) and then fill in the cuts with brick. You were asking earlier about how to edge your driveway - the brick would be one way to tie it in.

You're in FL, and I'm not sure what sort of soil you have - presumably sand - so you might have a problem with boring through the soil under the driveway. The sand might keep collapsing. The local contractors specializing in that stuff will have better information on what's standard in your area.
R
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RicodJour:
The cut in the slab is for the inside of the house. The driveway is not a problem was I can find an alternate bath to tie in outside. I may need to cut the inside building slab for a 72 feet long trench 8" wide to install a new 3" PVC main.
I did ask about a wall around the driveway which is a different property I have. That project I finished will post pics here soon.
This is a totally different nightmare...
MC
wrote:

If the existing driveway is in good condition without cracks or any serious note, not much. I'd get it over with, cut the driveway, run the line(s) and then fill in the cuts with brick. You were asking earlier about how to edge your driveway - the brick would be one way to tie it in.

You're in FL, and I'm not sure what sort of soil you have - presumably sand - so you might have a problem with boring through the soil under the driveway. The sand might keep collapsing. The local contractors specializing in that stuff will have better information on what's standard in your area.
R
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You have a lot of them.
R
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On Sat, 23 May 2009 13:04:33 -0700 (PDT), RicodJour

LMAO!
One day he may post the final pictures of this house or by that time a new repair cycle starts :-))
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wrote:

What do you mean by "FINAL"? LOL...
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wrote:

That's true. I should write the sequel to The Money Pit...
Money Pit II - The Revernge of the Tradesmen
LOL
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Subtitled: Going Off Half-Cocked
:)
R
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MiamiCuse wrote:

My uneducated guess would be about 30 years. After the fourth sewer reaming in about 4 years, the city scoped the sewer line. The condo assn. had it cleaned after that and the comment by the plumber was that it would be shiny clean but was nearing the end of it's useful life. The condo assn. had it scoped again shortly after that. I saw the pix, and they look like what you describe. The bottom of the pipe rusted away entirely. The condo was build around '75. Comment by the plumber was that sugar and salt hasten the deterioration ... can't imagine how much sugar that would require :o) We are in Fla., too. No new sewer line as yet.
After the city scoped the line, they installed a cleanout at the edge of the property, as anything beyond that is their responsibility. Anything with fiber (wet wipes, tampons, etc.) can snag in the corroded pipe and cause blockage. I suspect my potato peels have made it choke a couple of times :o)
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