Deck - can joists be laid flat?

Ground level deck, want to keep the height low to keep from impedeing bulkhead access. Can the joist be laid flat on the strucural beams instead of upright to keep the height down?
Thanks,
Bluesman
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bluesman wrote:

Sure . . . . . . . If you place the structural beams 6 inches apart.
--
Joseph E. Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Don't you mean 16 inches apart?
And for the original poster, the joists are only strong in the upright position.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bluesman wrote:

as mentioned, the beams (2x12?) do not have as much strength in the flat (2") as they do in the narrow (12") direction.
That said, since this is a ground level installation, you might be able to decrease the structual members to something smaller, and have more supports to prevent it from sagging.
Another option might be to build stressed skin platforms to give you a longer span in a less "tall" space.
Standard disclaimer... i'm not a builder and i don't know what your code might have to say about it.... these are just a few possible ideas. I think the one with the most merit is the extra supports with smaller joists....
Heck... if the deck is ground level... why not use brick and not worry about having to treat it, seal it, etc... Build a removable cover for the bulkhead that can act as a table, bench, etc while the area is being used as a deck...
--
be safe.
flip
Ich habe keine Ahnung was das bedeutet, oder vielleicht doch?
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bluesman wrote:

Skip the deck. Pour a concrete patio that will outlast 5 decks and give less maintenance every year.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Edwin Pawlowski" wrote in message

In a case like this, I totally agree. Was at a contractor's home today, he does stamped concrete. Knows what he is doing, and just awesome work. Looked like pavers, but much more stronger and very impressive.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Exactly what I thought. Even treated lumber decays over time, if laid on the ground, and with moisture right below it all the time, your finish (paint or stain) will erode quickly.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote (with possible editing):

Absolutely. Other alternatives include pavers or flagstone in sand, pointed or not. Just be sure to remove topsoil first (pretty basic, but it always surprises me how many don't bother).
--
Larry
snipped-for-privacy@lmr.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
No, deadhead, he meant 6"!
You need a course in recognizing sarcasm when you see it.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I don't know what "structural beams" you are referring to. A ground level deck is (as the term states) is supported from the ground. You lay PT 2x4s on the ground, digging where needed to give them continuous support, than screw the decking on top of them. I have built many of these. Some people like the look instead of pouring a slab. If you need support from your joist than you must stand it up that is where the strength comes from. You must also use the correct size depending on the span.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

What is holding the pressure treated 2 x 4's to the ground?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@netscape.net (Bluesman) writes:

gravity last i checked... ;)
--
be safe.
flip



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

And did you have a building permit when you built these? Here in NJ you'd be required to have proper footings poured below the frost line.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net (Chet Hayes) writes:

The question becomes, do you need a permit to build a pallet? ;)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Upstate NY If this was a deck there would be permits needed but this is not considered a deck since it is not connected to a structure and is less than 8" above grade. Just as there is no permit required to pour a patio slab. A slab is more likely to move due to frost. The concrete is a better conductor and the frost is deeper under a slab than bare ground. I have seen this many times in excavating in the spring.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Sure! If you want it to look like a wooden bowl in 6 months.....
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.