Cutting the cord

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On Sat, 19 Apr 2014 06:46:08 -0700 (PDT),

What are you going to use for internet service? Usually they will end up charging almost as much for just internet as they charge for internet and basic cable.
I have DSL and the phone is basically free. (DSL without phone service is as much as DSL and basic phone)
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On 4/19/2014 9:46 AM, JimmyDahGeek@DON'T_SPAM_ME_gmail.com wrote:

cable Internet for television. The question I have is when I put up an antenna can i just plug it into the coax cable coming into the house? I have my cable internet coming in on the same cable. Is this an issue or will it work.

Issue. Won't work.
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On Sat, 19 Apr 2014 16:00:24 -0400, Stormin Mormon

I have been away from cable internet for a while but when I had it, the internet signal was between Ch 4 and 5 VHF
If you combined that with broadcast I assume you might see some interference on those channels. I assume they will filter out the basic and "lifeline" channels that are on VHF if you buy internet only but I bet you will not really save any money doing it.
I have 6 different signals feeding the TV cable in my house. There are 4 satellite tuners on ch 73, 75, 77 and 79. My ReplayTV is on Ch3 and I have an agile modulator putting a PC monitor signal on Ch 69. They all coexist quite well. I have thought about integrating that with the antenna amp but I just have not done it yet. Part of my concern is a lightning hit on the antenna blowing up everything hooked to that cable. The way it is I would only lose 2 TVs.
I do have fairly robust surge protection tho.
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wrote:

Look at the difference between a tv with no antenna and one with rabbit ears. In that case, even a little cheap INDOOR antenna makes a lot of difference.
When I first** installed my large attic antenna, it got all the Baltimore stations and most DC stations. 40 miles from here. No rabbit ears had ever gotten more than one or two DC stations, plus the Baltimore stations. So you're wrong.
**My $10 antenna amp has failed, so the antenna doesn't do as well now, but I will replace it. Maybe I should have mentioned the value of an antenna amp to the OP, but he would find out about it soon. Anyhow, that's between me and Jimmy.

Now that is a lot of money, compared to (buying an antenna amp and) running a cable from the attic. And maybe considered ugly too, and a hazard if not built right or not maintained or in unusually high winds or if the ground shifts, etc.

Exactly. These days most people do live in a city or the suburbs. Jimmy didn't say where he lived.
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On Sat, 19 Apr 2014 06:46:08 -0700 (PDT),

It's not that hard to run a second cable into the house.
Part of my house overhangs the house in the back, and it's brown underneath, so some brown cable going up next to the brown downspout and then through an easy to drill hole that goes into the closet and it's barely noticeable.
Another cable went in through tthe aluminum basement window frame, in the empty space below the channel. So it didnt' interfere with the operation of the window. For that cable, it's worth using plain cable with no connector on the end yet, because it will go through a smaller hole (small enough to fit in the empty space below the window channel) , and then to add t he F-connector to the end. They make screw-on F-connectors though I've never gotten one to work. They also make normal F-connectors of various designs and fairly cheap pliers to put them on with. F-connector pliers are those which have a hexagon shaped hole between the jaws when the jaws are closed. That's how a hexagonal crimp is put on the round connector sleeve during attaching.
There are all kinds of "putty" or sealant to close the small space remaining between the hole and the cable. I think just about anything will work.
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On Saturday, April 19, 2014 1:56:09 PM UTC-7, micky wrote:

hen I put up an antenna can i just plug it into the coax cable coming into the house? I have my cable internet coming in on the same cable. Is this an issue or will it work.

I am having a very hard time following the technical discussion on these th reads about splitting and connectors, etc.
Is anyone addressing the basic question which I THOUGHT this thread was abo ut:
CAN I GET CABLE WITHOUT PAYING FOR IT?
Earlier in this thread, someone noted succinctly that one could get away wi th it for maybe a week until the cable company noticed.
Am I misunderstanding? If so, what IS this about?
HB
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On Saturday, April 19, 2014 4:12:42 PM UTC-5, Higgs Boson wrote:

I have Cable TV/Phone/Internet...I have one TV with a cablebox and 2 on splitters that gives you the basic channels (no HD). I would think if you are paying for internet they wouldn't say anything if you hook-up a TV and get basic stuff! My.02
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On 04/19/2014 05:12 PM, Higgs Boson wrote:

If you combine an antenna feed with a cable TV feed, you will create signal problems that will be detected by the cable company. The cable companies remedy may be to cut the offending subscriber off.
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On 04/19/2014 06:51 PM, Pthirus Pubis wrote:
[snip]

And that setup may not work because of interference.
You would need a suitable filter so the OTA channels aren't entering the cable from the cable company. Depending on the frequencies involved, this could be an expensive filter, and subject to change (when the cable company changes the channels your cable internet uses).
It's still be easier to use a separate cable for the internet.
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wrote:

the DC stations (from northwest DC) and a fairly good picture from Baltimore. I went up on a 15' mast on the roof with a rotor so I could swing around south and I could get Richmond fairly well (enough to see a blacked out Redskin game), 100 miles away. DC and Baltimore were crystal clear.
If you just wanted DC stations you could run a wire to the center screw of an outlet plate.
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On Sat, 19 Apr 2014 14:12:42 -0700 (PDT), Higgs Boson

Your collider friends should be able to explain it to you.

That's not what the thread was about.

I'm not going to tell you. You should pay for your cable like everyone else.

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.

YOu have it wrong. The origional question is much differant.
The person has cable , he wants to stop the cable TV but keep the internet by cable.
When he does this, he wants to know if he puts up an outside antenna, can he just connect it to the same cable that is already there while using that cable for the internet.
The answer is NO, he must run a cable from the outside antenna to each TV.
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On 04/19/2014 04:24 PM, Ralph Mowery wrote:
[snip]

Unexplained "NO" answers are usually wrong.
It is possible with the proper filters, although you'd have to know the frequencies involved (don't forget the cable internet uses separate downstream and upstream channels).
However, it'd be easier to put in a separate cable for the modem.
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Ed,

If you're willing to wait, most of the Discovery shows eventually end up on Netflix. I think Hulu carries some of the others. You have to subscribe to these two services, but they're usually cheaper than cable TV subscriptions.

We live way out in the country, but with a good outdoor antenna I get a decent signal for the local stations (ABC, CBS, NBC, PBS). Thankfully, all of my local stations are in the same general direction.
Anthony Watson www.watsondiy.com www.mountainsoftware.com
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On Sat, 19 Apr 2014 17:24:58 -0400, "Ralph Mowery"

from the cable Dmark to the cable modem which could be right where it comes in the house. Then WiFi or CAT5 to all of your PCs.
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Last I checked, Comcast charged $12 for the basic local TV channels, or I had to pay a $10 fee if all I wanted was internet. So, getting the local TV stations was a no-brainer.
A few months ago Comcast switched to encrypted digital TV. I never watch live TV, I record everything using TV tuners in my computer. Their new encryption scheme was incompatible with my TV tuners, so I dropped the TV service and switched to an antenna. Even with the No-TV fee, my bill went down about $5/month.
The only thing I lost in the switch was Discovery channel. I just wait till the shows come to Netflix (which I subscribe to already), or watch a show on the Discovery web site if it's urgent.
Anthony Watson www.watsondiy.com www.mountainsoftware.com
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I just gave the simple answer. Others gave the more complicated technical version.
I know what I would do if I wanted to run a cable modem and an outside antenna. Just did not want to add to the confusion.,but would do something like you said.
I mostly do that every time my cable TV goes out and I want to watch some TV. No internet, but if it does come on I know it and have internet and then connect the regular cable back up. I am about 40 miles from each of 2 big cities. Get about 30 channels on the outside antenna.
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On Sat, 19 Apr 2014 17:18:15 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I'm not saying that a tower or mast isn't a good thing, but the previous poster went far beyond saying that a tower was better than the attic. He said regarding an antenna: "Indoor; even in the attic; is a waste of money", and that's not true. " Just go for a proper tower unless you live in a city." so I think he was recommending a self-standing tower, wasn't even satisfied with a mast.

Sounds good. Do I need more parts, or just a wire from there to the center hole of the co-ax connector?
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On 2014-04-19 6:51 PM, micky wrote:

of reception. Why do anything to a maximum of 70% efficiency?
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On 04/19/2014 08:03 PM, Adam Kubias wrote:
[snip]

If the signal is strong enough, 70% will give you a picture EXACTLY like 100% will. An attic installation may be preferable in other ways.
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