Cutting cast iron bath tub with circular saw

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Is it possible to cut a cast iron bathtub with a circular saw? I bought the metal cutting abrasive blades, but it is eating up the blade faster than the bathtub. Ended up with a heap of black dust from the blade, but only a small dent in the bath tub. The cut is getting red hot, and sparks are flying. At this rate, it will take me days to get through. I am wondering if there is an easier way. I can't use a sledge hammer as there isn't much room for swing. Perhaps a different kind of blade? Any ideas are appreciated. Thanks!
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Andrew Sarangan wrote:

If you can't use a sledgehammer, use a pneumatic hammer or an electric jackhammer.
BTW, you would need a masonary blade rather than a metal-cutting blade to get through the porcelain.
Bob
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flip tub upside down, stand on it swing sledge!
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Wrong tools. Use a pick!!! Sort of thing for miners breaking rock.
Someone at Home Depot told me how you just couldn't break up one of those old tubs, I brought him a square of it in my back pocket. Took less than an hour to have that tub reduced to pieces that could fit into a bucket.

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I worked my way thru school working for a plumbing company. I never saw a cast iron tub that wouldn't break up after a few good blows.
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I have no advice, but I wish you well. I helped carry a bath tube down a flight of stairs a couple years ago, and that can't be right. Once we got it outside, we tried breaking it up with a sledgehammer, but nothing happened.
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toller wrote:

They *do* make steel tubs as well as cast iron :)
--
dadiOH
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steel tubs are generally much lighter than cast iron. If you carried a cast iron one down some stairs, you would remember it.
bill

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Andrew Sarangan wrote:

http://www.stretcher.com/stories/99/991129h.cfm
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On 30 Jan 2005 13:41:17 -0600, Andrew Sarangan

If you had some way to avoid burning down your house, a cutting torch works well.
Also sharp items like a pick axe will punch through most times and once the metal starts to fracture it will usually cause a chain reaction so you can smash the rest up with a sledge hammer.
However, sometimes you get one of those extra tough old @#$@@'s and nothing works.
Good luck.
Drifter "I've been here, I've been there..."
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and

a few minutes, then hit it with the BFH?
aem sends, tongue firmly in cheek....
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If the water closet is in your way, remove it. You will need the space to maneuver any way, no matter what kind of tub it is. Put an old blanket or heavy visqueen over the tub to catch shrapnel. Swing a big hammer. If it dents like a car rather than shattering, it is a steel tub.
(top posted for your convenience) ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ Keep the whole world singing . . . . DanG (remove the sevens) snipped-for-privacy@7cox.net

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Andrew Sarangan wrote:

Must be one strange tub. There is plenty of room to swing a pick or sledge inside the tub. It shouldn't take a round-house swing, especially with a pick, to start it cracking. Cast iron is brittle and once you start a crack it breaks up fast. You should drape it with a blanket tho.
Harry K
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I broke up a cast iron tub with a sledge before...20 minutes and it was in little pieces. 1000% easier than I thought it would be.
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I've tried it with both a pick and a sledge. Had to have more of a swing with a sledge, so I switched over to a pick.

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Andrew Sarangan wrote:

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Andrew Sarangan wrote:

I missed it too. WEAR SAFETY GLASSES no matter how you finally do it. I am wearing an artificial lens now because I didn't while doing nothing more than driving a nail (mis strike).
Harry K
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hi guys
I bought a pick axe as suggested by some people here, covered the bathtub with a tarp, and tried to break it. No joy. Every time I banged it, the porcelain broke off, but there was no sign of damage to the metal underneath. What am I doing wrong? Am I not hitting it hard enough?
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Andrew Sarangan wrote:

Repeated blows to the same spot is the answer. I wouldn't think that excessive power will accomplish much but gentle tapping won't either.
Harry K
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