Cut ceramic tile with circular saw?

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Got ceramic tile (over plywood) in the kitchen, and I'm replacing the island with a larger one so need to cut some of the tiles away. Luckily it's all straight cuts!
Question: can this be done with a circular saw (I've got a 7-1/4" Ryobi)? Do I use one of those fiber masonry blades or something else?
Thanks!
Eric Law
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"EL"

Those fiber blades are good for backer board at best. A diamond blade will work, but you may want to weigh the cost of buying a decent one against the cost of renting a little tile saw for a day. The diamond blades without the sectioning along the circumference tend to be cheaper, but produce far worse quality cuts because as the blade heats up, it warps - often a lot. The sectioning helps prevent that, but these blades tend to cost more.
- Nate
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EL said"

Nate replied

He said the tile is over plywood. How do you use the tile cutting saw with a piece of plywood countertop?
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i think he's thinking of the floor, and i don't think you can get the tile saw down that far.
makita makes a hand wet saw with a diamond blade. i've used a 4" dry diamond blade in a 4" hand circular saw, but there is a lot of dust to worry about.
you could also install the new island on top of the tile.
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Save yourself a lot of grief and rent a water saw.
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Curious - what kind of grief?
Just to clarify, these are floor tiles I'm cutting, and I'm hoping to cut them in place so would be using a portable saw. Seems like using water in this situation could create quite a mess, no?
Is there any difference between a dry "tile saw" and a regular circular saw? They look the same in photos. Different RPM maybe?
Eric Law

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<< Curious - what kind of grief? >>
Breaking tiles and blades. Plus you can work faster by not having to worry about overheating the materials.
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"EL"

Yes. Dry blades don't need water, but are limited in how long and hard you can run them. The segmented (dry) ones work great, but cost 35-50 bucks. The non-segmented ones warp very fast with the heat, and will be very difficult to make a straight cut with.

The diamond blades you buy for your 7 1/4 saw are designed for typical 7 1/4 saw RPMs. They don't need water either. Someone figured this out for you when they decided to sell a 7 1/4 " diamond blade for your circular saw.
This is really an easy thing. And, no, I wasn't suggesting putting your counter top under a tile wet saw - sheesh - just renting a small portable ~4" one instead of buying a decent blade.
But forget all that - why are you cutting your tile floor up when it sounds like you don't need to? An island? Put it on top of the tile. In the kitchens I've done, I put tile wall-wall before I put the counters in. Saves a whole lot of fitting, cutting, measuring, shimming etc. for minimal extra material and labor cost. Appliances slide right in.
- Nate
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Nate,
Thanks for the info!
Primary reason I'm cutting tile is there's already an island there, sitting directly on the subfloor. We're just replacing it with a bgger one, but in some places the new island wouldn't have any tile to sit on.
That and I think it just looks a little more "finished" when there's a little grouted gap between the tile and the wood. Much bigger "PITA factor" though!
Eric

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Considering the expense, labor and mess you are about to make and clean up after for a year or so, may I suggest that you remove the old island, fill in the gap with some odd lot tiles and set you new island on top of the floor.
If you don't think so now; by the time you are finished doing it your way you will firmly believe that a clean crisp caulk line is far more beautiful than "a little grouted gap".
Either way, have fun!
Colbyt
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hey, maybe he wants an all day, dust bomb kind of ordeal for the sport of it :)
Bill

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On 1/15/2005 10:02 AM US(ET), bill a took fingers to keys, and typed the following:

I recently took up a tile floor with 9" glazed clay tiles glued to thin plywood. We just cut in the grout lines, so we could get manageable pieces of tile covered plywood that didn't weigh 100 lbs each. Expecting to get a lot of dust, we covered all the door openings into the kitchen. Then, using a diamond blade in a Craftsman 7-1/4" Circ. saw, we began to cut with the saw depth set to the thickness of the tile and plywood base. After a few minutes of sawing and seeing the rapidly building up of a cloud, we went to a semi-wet operation. My nephew used the saw and I continuously sprayed the blade front with water from a 1 quart plastic spray bottle. We just traded dust for mud. It's a dirty job either way.

--
Bill

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Years ago a coworker was talking about hanging drywall in his garage or wherever, and he was complaining about all the dust.... Huh?
Found out that he was cutting the drywall with a circular saw! I was pretty much speechless.
bill

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I would consider the idea of breaking out the tiles to fit, and then for the gap retile the area with some spare tiles left over from the original job, or tile with a complimentary but different tile around the base.
Another idea would be to make your new island with the same footprint as the old one, but design it with some sort of gussets to support a larger top.
--

Roger Shoaf

About the time I had mastered getting the toothpaste back in the tube, then
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You can buy abrasive tile cutting blades for your 7.25 inch circular saw. For what you are doing, it will be fine. I have found them at a freight liquidation store for under $3 each. Just make sure to WEAR GOGGLES!!! A full face shield would be even better, as this is going to throw some high velocity grit and chips.
BB
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Eric,
I had the same problem with a tub. I ended up using a masonary blade in a circular saw to cut the tile and mortor bed. I set the blade to cut the tile but not the sub floor. I would remove the tile first and the cut the plywood with a regular blade. I don't know how well the masonary blade works on wood. Go slow wear wear full protection (long sleves, gloves, pants, eye and dust mask) just in case the tile chips or the blade blows up. I didnt have a problem with the tiles cracking or chipping but it could. Also the tules could loosen and you might end up having to reset the tile and grout. I have also use a masonary blade to cut thick tiles but a wet saw is far superior.
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Just to clarify, when I suggested renting a water saw, I thought he was cutting ceramic floor tile.
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Just to clarify, when I suggested renting a water saw, I thought he was cutting ceramic floor tile.
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I too need to cut a straight row of tile in-place, but in my case the ceramic tile is on the wall. The need for cutting the tiles is to extend the line of cabinets to match the originals which have the tile cutout.
What is the *best* way: A. 7-1/4" (cordless) circular saw with diamond blade (preferably segmented)
B. Special (rental) 4" rotary saw with tile cutting blade
C. Roto zip tool with diamond tile bit
D. Dremel with special attachment (not sure which one but I am sure Dremel has one :)
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writes:

b if the rotary saw is a wet saw. otherwise i'd do a with someone following me with a shopvac.
c & d are the same.
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