Crazy Painting problem - NEED SERIOUS HELP

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I am pulling my hair out. I had a bedroom and bathroom constructed in my basement. 5 days after the drywall had been mudded and sanded I put on one coat of Kilz Oil based primer. The next day I put on a coat of satin latex based Behr paint on the ceiling. 1 day following the ceiling paint I used Behr Bed and Bath paint on the walls, WITHOUT cutting in, I was leaving the cut in for last (doesn't make sense I know). I followed that up the following night with a second top coat. The second coat was applied pretty thick with a 3/4" nap. That night I left a window open in the basement to help alleviated the smell. It got down to 45 degrees that night and I had 65% humidity in the basement. When I checked the bathroom the following morning there was sweat all over the walls. There was even a small amount of sweat above the shower where there would be green board (the shower has never been used). That's my first mystery. I let the room sit for two days without touching it. After two days I went to remove the tape and the layers of top coat peeled away in many areas when I tried to remove the tape. The walls felt like they could have been a slight bit dusty underneath. I'm trying to figure out what caused these issues and what I should do next. PLEASE HELP!!
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Finman wrote:

I think it likely that the mud was not sufficiently dry, and oil-based primer over that was not the right choice. I don't know the normal set time for mud, but in a damp basement I would expect it to be longer. Oil-based primer is the wrong choice for new wallboard, as far as I know. Latex is recommended, and there are special latex primers for new wallboard. Painter's tape should be removed as soon as the paint is applied, even if you must do a second coat, as the paint film overlapping the edge of the tape is continuous with the film on the wall and pulls away with the tape if allowed to dry. Don't ask how I know :o)
I started painting a bath in my home, roughly 3 hours after the last shower. I tried to brush paint (alkyd) onto the ceiling and the brush just slid across the ceiling = there was still enough moisture in the bath, even with exhaust fan, to keep the ceiling wet. I wiped it dry, got another fan going, and the paint went on fine.
For painting in a basement, I would allow more time for drying than the label calls for, and do it in warm, dry weather.
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You can't put Latex over oil... Scrape down the walls the best you can and repaint with oil.
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on 9/14/2007 9:55 PM Noozer said the following:

Fron: http://www.kilz.com/pages/default.aspx?NavID #
"KILZ Original primer/sealer will dry to the touch in 30 minutes and can be recoated or topcoated in one hour with *either latex or oil-based paint*. It makes an excellent enamel undercoater, leaving the surface well prepared for a smooth, enamel finish."
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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Noozer wrote:

Not true - latex can go on an oil primer.
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on 9/15/2007 5:53 AM Norminn said the following:

Latex can go over any Oil or Alkyd paint. It's Oil and Alkyd that is not recommended over Latex
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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willshak wrote:

If we are talking about primers, either alkyd or latex paint can go over either alkyd or latex primer, assuming they aren't some special formulation. Paint over paint is another story. The secret to primers is allowing them to dry/cure properly.
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wrote:

Bzzt -- wrong answer. Latex over oil *primer* is perfectly fine.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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wrote:

Preparation of the walls are the most important and most time consuming. Painting is easier.
-- Oren
"I didnt say it was your fault, I said I was blaming you."
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What is this suppose to mean? It is not even relevant.
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Finman wrote:

If there is enough dust on the surface it can interfere with paint adhesion.
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Finman wrote:

Hi, Holly cow! What's the rush? Oil and Latex? I don't get it. For me using anything oil is thing of past! No exhaust fan in the bath room?
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Kilz I believe is a lacquer, I've used it many times on walls mostly stained it keeps the stains from bleeding threw. I have never had a problem putting latex over it. On a newly taped wall usually you use PVA to seal it.
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I'm wondering how bad it is really peeling. If the chips are big, like fingernail size or bigger, then I'd say you have adhesion problems. But even the best paint jobs will chip when you pull the masking tape, if you leave it on too long. Masking tape should be pulled as soon as possible. You should also score the cut line with a razor knife, especially if you have waited too long before pulling it. Really, pro painters don't use a lot of masking tape. It is better to cut with a brush.
As for the condensation, that happened because paint introduced a lot of moisture into the air, and by opening the window, the air got below the dew point. Shouldn't really cause any problems provided the paint was dry to the touch before water got to it.
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I could peel the paint approx. 1" in many places. It is not just a little chip. I used oil based because I wanted a "no odor" primer and that was all I could find. No latex available in no odor that I know of.
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Finman wrote:

Hi, I think the wall was not really dry. And the low temp did not help either. Can you heat the room or use a portable heater?
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I could use a portable heater. How can I tell if it is dry or not?
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I used a portable heater in the room all night. This morning when I try to peel additional paint off it seems to be much more resistant. I'm starting to think that it was not fully dry when I tried to remove the tape. I appreciate all of the advice that I have received here. Thank you to everyone for lending a helping hand!
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Finman wrote:

Paint takes at least a week to dry.
--

dadiOH
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clipped

I think more people are bothered by oil odor than by latex. If odor is a problem, keep a window open in the room being painted and use an exhaust fan to keep odor moving out. Warm, dry weather is painting time :o)
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