Cracked inner panel of dual pane glass (Caused by window film or cellular shades w/ tracks?)

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<<Do you have window screens on the outside of the window? Those would help, and you should get enough airflow through the screen to keep heat buildup from being a problem. >>
Even today (with no window film) the shades alone caused the window to get so hot I could not keep my hand on it.
The window screens were on the inside (between the shade and the window). Today I don't have the screens installed, since I had to remove them to get rid of the window film, and will install them again after I have new glass panels installed (looking into getting low e) for the two adjacent windows. The screens did not help since they were on the inside of the window.
Frankly, I'm afraid to continue using the insulated shade with the side tracks since it causes the glass to get very hot. I'd even bet that the insulated shade played as much, or even a greater, a role toward causing the crack than the window film (since the window film was not very effective).
J.
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You had a warning from the film co for good reason. Now why not call glass companys, everyone and you are just guessing here. Go get the facts from the man that makes glass ....
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<<You had a warning from the film co for good reason. Now why not call glass companys, everyone and you are just guessing here. Go get the facts from the man that makes glass ....

I just downloaded a .PDF of Anderson's 20 limited warrantee. They list damage due to "insulated coverings" as an exclusion in the warrantee (as well as tinted window coverings).
J.
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Also, "Four Seasons Sunrooms" mentions that they do not cover damage due to "use of insulated shades during daylight hours" in their glass warranty.
J.
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Well if Anderson and 4 seasons have that exclusion then there is an issue. Good you found out for me I was thinking about your shades. Your shades are R 5 , that is the highest R for a shade Ive seen, it is equal to a Tri pane or 1" of pink foamboard is r5.5. True your glass should not be Too hot to touch. High R shades are usualy meant for night heat loss. Was there a warning with your shades ? There should have been. I have Anderson and pella, , maybe the exclusion is new I do not remember seeing it . Before I get cellulars I will research it more. I just put in a 5x8 Tripane id hate to break it. Why not just open a window and get fresh air in.
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<<Was there a warning with your shades ? There should have been. I have Anderson and pella, , maybe the exclusion is new I do not remember seeing it . Before I get cellulars I will research it more. I just put in a 5x8 Tripane id hate to break it. Why not just open a window and get fresh air in.>>
There was no warning. Anyway, the shades would likely not be a problem as long as the sidetracks aren't installed (but then why bother with a high r value shade with gaps). With the sidetracks, it creates the seal on the sides that traps the hot air between the shade and the glass on a sunny day.
J.
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<< If the shades are actually any good at reflecting radiated heat, then you don't WANT low-E film, you want the light to come in, bounce off the shades, and bounce back out, without even noticing that there was a window there.>>
You have a point. However, the shades aren't reflective enough that the light would simply bounce back out the window. If that were the case, then the shades would look like a mirror. The light tended to get converted into heat when it hit the shade, once converted to heat, this caused the heat to be trapped between the shade and the window, rather than just bouncing out. Granted the window film wasn't helping matters, but the shades (Which happen to have side tracks to seal the edges) were causing the trapped heat to "bake the heck" out of the glass.
J.
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Well you learned the hard way. Follow the instructions.
The good part is you can now replace that pane (you are going to need to replace it unless you like cloudy glass) with a new low-e pane that will likely go a long way towards reducing that heat gain, and will also help keep the heat in during the winter. It will cost a little more, but based on my personal use, it will be well worth it.
Don't worry about the shades, they did not cause the problem.
--
Joseph Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
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<<Don't worry about the shades, they did not cause the problem.>>
Well, today is another very sunny day. When these insulated shades (with side tracks) are pulled down for a while, and then I pull them up and touch the window glass, the glass is hot, and is VERY hot toward the top 1/3 of the panel (can't even keep my hand on the panel).
The glass did not get that hot when using the outside mounted levelor aluminum blinds that were there when I bought the condo.
Do you still think the shades have nothing to do with it even though they cause the glass to get VERY hot?
J.
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It's really hard to say exactly what caused it.
I think you need to replace the windows with EXACTLY what was there before, and conduct more experiments.
I'd say if you do this about 50 times, you should have a definite cause/effect relationship nailed down. Please do post back with the results.
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jay wrote:

Yes.
--
Joseph Meehan

26 + 6 = 1 It's Irish Math
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Bad thing to do. NEVER put tinted film on the inside of sealed units. The film instructions should have made that clear.
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