copper or cpvc water pipes?

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My house has cpvc water pipes - the person who owned it before me re-plumbed the house and this is what he used. Is this superior to copper? Is one preferred over the other?
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Zootal wrote:

For durability, I doubt there is much difference. Copper will corode and CPVC won't but...
For ease of maintenance and making changes, it is CPVC hands down.
Harry K
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I've always used copper. Very durable and strong. If I have to change something, I solder them together, ready to go, no waiting for glue to dry. However, gluing is admittedly faster and easier then soldering, and modern pvc glues dry in full strength in a few hours. How strong is cpvc? I'm afraid I'll accidently hit the pipe and break it, or twisting it when I thread a fitting on and break it. I keep thinking of PVC, which is relatively brittle.
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Well plastic wouldnt get ripped off!
My dad used to rent homes in phoenix, he had to go all plastic since tenants would steal the copper pipes and everything else of value out of the homes....
with todays high copper prices people are finding their gutters downspouts and other copper stuff has grown feet and left the building:(
Plastic is safe at least for now:)
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Yeah, and the liberal judges overlook it, because all landlords are evil!!

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On Wed, 9 Aug 2006 19:30:05 -0700, "Zootal"

The blue stuff is ready in a minute or so.

If it hasn't been out in the sun for 10 years I am not sure how you would break it.

Again, only if it has been out in the sun a long time. People build lawn furniture out of PVC
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Hmmm...learn something new every day. Full pressure in a few minutes?

I've seen PVC chairs collapse. But it didn't break - it was just too thin, and could not hold the weight.
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On Wed, 9 Aug 2006 20:32:30 -0700, "Zootal"

They call it "wet or dry". Irrigation techs usually turn the pumps back on as soon as they can walk back to the switch. They say it is good in 30 seconds but I think a couple minutes is a better number. I know you can't pull a pipe joint apart after a minute or so.
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Zootal wrote:

Yes, and not just the blue stuff. A big advantage of PVC/CPVC is the ease of repair and modification. It is flexible enough that given a few feet either side of the patch it can be cut and a new fitting inserted. Can't do that with copper (easily).

They were using the wrong schedule PVC then.
Harry K
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I've always used copper as well. In saying that however, I just had to re-route water lines and install and aerator etc.... I found the selection of copper fittings to be rather poor and the prices were outrageous. Have you priced a 10' stick of 3/4 Type L recently? $34! And the fittings are all running a few bucks on up (each). So I could definitely see the advantages of CPVC given what appeared to be a better selection of fittings and much, much cheaper. For the odd bit I do, I'll prolly stick with Cu but if I were outfitting a whole house, I'd sure be looking at plastic! Cheers, cc
ps. I prolly just like copper cause of the torch and such.....just don't get the same effect with a little stick with glue on it :)
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I forgot to add--No, copper will not corrode. There are some houses with copper lines that are over a hundred years old and still working fine. The Gothic cathedrals of Europe have copper roofs that are nearly a thousand years old. It does however allow for build-up of mineral deposits inside the hot water tubing, that can be a nuisance in maybe 50 years or so, depending upon how bad your local water supply is. Use plastic, copper hangers with brass screws, or wrap electrical tape around the pipe if steel straps are used, as copper will produce electrolysis and corrode other metals when in direct contact with them.

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Certain water supplies have had a corrosive effect on copper. This is mostly in the south western states. People have had problems after 20 years.
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I have seen corroded copper.
If copper doesn't corrode, why do we have to sandscreen and wirebrush it before we sweat?
--

Christopher A. Young
You can\'t shout down a troll.
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You should talk to the people in Cape Coral Florida. They have plenty of pinholed copper piper..
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Seen the price of copper, lately?
--

Christopher A. Young
You can\'t shout down a troll.
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wrote:

But copper wont crack when someone bumps into it, CPVC will. Copper wont sag between the hangers, CPVC does. Copper dont shatter when a screw on fitting is over tightened, CPVC does. Copper dont make the hot water taste like plastic, CPVC does.

I dont consider waiting hours for the glue to dry to be "ease of maintenance". Soldering is more work, but the pipes can be used a few minutes after soldering. CPVC needs hours to dry securely and until them, No Water".

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On Thu, 10 Aug 2006 12:13:15 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

Your union rep teach you that?
You can take a piece of CPVC pipe and pound it flat with a hammer and not shatter it. U/V damaged white PVC gerts brittle but that is usually after about 10 years in the Florida sun. People use PVC pipe for guides on boat trailers and boat lifts here in South Florida. If it was as brittle as you say it would snap off the fist time the wind caught your boat. That is not what happens.
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wrote:

U/V damaged white PVC gerts brittle but that is

I have to smile. Here in NM, PVC lasts about 8-12 months exposed!
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On Thu, 10 Aug 2006 21:16:33 -0600, "James \\"Cubby\\" Culbertson"

How do they plumb swimming pools?
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wrote:

Beats me. Never looked. Most pools are below ground so I'd imagine the piping is below ground. I'm really going from my own experience of where I've left a couple sticks of the stuff outside in the weather and within 10 months or so, it was pretty brown (from white).
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