converting an old rotary phone to work now

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Call the phone company. Phones with cords requires special expertise by trained technicians from the phone company. Only they know the proper wires to hook up to in the box. They can come out on Thursday between 2:00 and 4:00.
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And they actually show up Friday at 7:12 AM? I think I met that guy.
--
Christopher A. Young
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On Sun, 10 Aug 2008 08:45:10 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@verizon.net wrote:

I think the odds are more than 1/2 that it will work fine. Just conect one of the two wires from the phone to the red wire on the wall and the other to the green. Which is red and which is green don't matter with dial phones, but if they do have colors, you might want to attach red to red and green to green.
This is most easy if you have a box mounted on the surface somewhere, because they have covers that come off, but if all your phone jacks are below the surface of the wall, with only the hole sticking out, you can still take off the wall plate and make your connections there.
If your phone system no longer works with dial phones, you still won't harm the phone system. They're designed to handle even long short circuits, much longer than the split-second pulse-shorts that rotary phones make.
I haven't tested this for decades, but used to be, if the red and green were shorted to each other for a long time, 50 seconds in a row?, the line would go almost dead (no dial tone but maybe some background noise) and I had to wait for about 10 minutes before the dial tone came back. No big deal.
I have a dial phone in my basement, probably not as old or pretty as yours, and it works fine.
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I believe that the old rotary phones were 3 wire, not two. It's been a long time, but I think it was red/green/yellow (or was it red/green/black) They connected to the matched red and green on the jack with the third color attached to the red (again, I think). The third wire was necessary to power the bell (yes, those phones had mechanical bells).
--
Peace,
BobJ




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Marilyn & Bob wrote:

Ring voltage comes in on the talk pair. If you're holding it when a ring comes through you can get quite a surprise.
Standard pairings are red-green for line 1 and yellow-black for line 2. Been that way as long as I can remember, in the US anyway.
--
--
--John
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On Sun, 10 Aug 2008 18:19:49 -0400, "Marilyn & Bob"

phones, but there are certainly plenty of two wire dial phones**. The cord may have 4 wires but in that case only the red and green are for talking. . Princess phones used the other two wires for a light, but I don't think he has a princess.
My oldest phone would go in the living room if I had a jack there. It's probably older than I am, 61, but has only two wires.
Its bottom is like half a grapefruit face down, but black with a dial on the front, and a four pronged almost bakelite cradle above it that holds the handset maybe two inches higher than the grapefruit. The sillhouette of this phone is often used to indicate Ma Bell or telephones in general.
I bought it in 1967 at Olsen's Electronics, on Western Avenue in Chicago ,across the street from Allied Radio. They had a big 3 foot x3x3 box full of phones for 99 cents, plus a handset from another box for 15 cents. I bought three handsets but only one phone. I wish I'd bought more. They must have been at least 20 years old at that time.
Just two wires.
**I remember the day I came home from school and our non-dial phones were changed for dial phones. The desk phone in my parents' room was changed totally, but the wall phone, which was a little rectangular box with a hook for the handset, was still there. The repairman had taken off the flat 2x2" top and replaced it with a top that had a dial. I didn't take it apart, but I'm sure he spliced the dial into one of the wires inside. ...Unless he did change the phone and the rest lookesd so much alike that I missed it.
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On Sun, 10 Aug 2008 18:19:49 -0400, "Marilyn & Bob"

That was for selective ringing on a party line. Just hook the green and yellow to the green on the new jack. Red to red.
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

You are correct.

I agree.
Since there are still many, MANY rotary phones in service out there, I am unaware of any PUBLIC switch that does not respond to dial pulses.
Also, more and more services that, in the past, required Touchtone<r> (press '1' for this, '2' for that), are converting to voice response so an old dial pulse phone is actually returning to nearly full functionality.
What goes around, comes around...
--
:)
JR

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On Sun, 10 Aug 2008 21:21:23 -0500, Jim Redelfs

I still have two hooked up. One is an old pay phone I have outside by the pool (they are quite weather resistant). The other was the original phone in this 40 year old house and still has the telco printed phone number on the dial face. Sprint/Embarq still supports rotary dialing. Of the half dozen phones we have hooked up here only one is not W/E.
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wrote:

Yes that is exactly what I meant. You need to connect both the green and the yellow wires from the phone cord (thanks for the memory trigger) to the green wire on the jack or the bell will not ring.
--
Peace,
BobJ


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THANK YOU TO ALL - next question I have - I got the phone connected and it works, I've received and made calls - only thing is that the volume I Hear is low, the other person hears me fine, but the sound I hear is low, there appears to be maybe a volume dial on the bottom of the phone but that doesn't help - is there anything else I could do to increase the volume of the earpiece?
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On Aug 10, 11:20pm, snipped-for-privacy@verizon.net wrote:

That is indeed a volume control, but it is for the bell. The only thing that might help is a new earpiece speaker.
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On Sun, 10 Aug 2008 21:20:21 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@verizon.net wrote:

Has anyone been in there screwing with the wiring inside the phone? The "network" could be miswired. The other thing is the dial itself has a contact to make it quieter when dialing. That may be dirty.
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On Aug 10, 10:56pm, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Yes and no:
In most cases and on a single party line the 'third wire' allowed the 'ringer (electromechanical bell inside phone or sometimes even separate) to be connected, or not connected as required.
The above posting is correct that on 'some' party lines the ringing was sent on one side of the line (with respect to ground) for, say, one party on a two party line and other side of the line for the other party!
There were also other other systems of ringing; including multiparty coded ringing (two longs and short etc.) which also sometimes used one side of the line or the other.
And ringing systems that used different frequencies of ringing; there was on for example (Sold by AECo. Chicago), that allowed for five different ringing frequencies, 16, 25, 33, 50 , 66 cycle/hertz etc. and with those five frequencies on each side of the telephone line it was possible to have up to ten parties on one line. This was usually on long rural lines; but am familiar with one city that used to have four parties on a line, using the different frequency ringing. That city did not use ringing to ground (i.e. one side of the line because of the difficulty, in that rocky and high resistivity of the soil location, of obtaining and maintaining good ground connections! So in that instance the four (not five) frequencies were sent on the pair of wires, not in respect to ground.
The advantage being that only one party's phone would ring on an incoming call; thus allowing a 'little more' privacy!
ALL OF WHICH: Leads to another comment/suggestion to the original poster: If you wish or have trouble getting your 'vintage' phone to ring on incoming calls (and you wish to have it so) check that the ringer/bell is connected either by that third lead or internally inside the phone. Also if it is of some non North American manufacture it 'may' have been designed to work best on some ringing frequency other than the 20 hertz most commonly used in North America; however recollection is that the non frequency selective ringing phones are usually not that sensitive to ringing frequency and would sometimes ring (continuously or intermittently) when power faults came in contact with telephone lines.
Strikes one that there must have been as many varieties of phones around the world since Alexander Graham, a Scottish immigrant to Canada discovered the principle of turning speech into variations of electric current, as the many versions of radios/wireless sets in use since the advent of radio transmission.
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Plug it in, it should work. The system is backward compatible in most areas.
s

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Steve Barker DLT wrote:

Plug? What's that?
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On Sun, 10 Aug 2008 21:11:04 -0500, Steve Kraus

One of those big 4-prong plugs? Those with a square arrangement with about an inch between prongs. It's the first phone plug I remember seeing.
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Mark Lloyd
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On Sun, 10 Aug 2008 18:51:09 -0500, "Steve Barker DLT"

However, those old phones required considerably more current to ring than most new electronic phones. That may not be available.

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Mark Lloyd
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On Sun, 10 Aug 2008 18:51:09 -0500, "Steve Barker DLT"

I wonder it it'd work with MagicJack.

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Go to radio shack. They used to have adaptors from four pin to modular.
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Christopher A. Young
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