converting an old rotary phone to work now

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I just got an old rotary phone from an antique store - the original cord is attached - I want to hook it up and use it in my home - what do I do??
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Disney,
Check with your phone company to be sure that your local exchange can process rotary information or make a converter to take the rotary signals (pulses) and convert them to tone dialing. My local exchange still accepts pulse dialing but many businesses use voice mail systems that aren't compatible with pulse dialing.
Dave M.
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On Aug 10, 1:45 pm, snipped-for-privacy@verizon.net wrote:

It may work just as is. Certainly likely to be able to answer an incoming call; o if it is in working condition at all.
Many telephone lines, at least those from regular 'line' telcos. Will still accept the pulses from the rotary dial.
We have such a dial equipped phone in our hallway and it works just fine, although we tend to use a cordless phone because of ease of use and ease of pushing buttons and redialling etc.
But when there is the occasional power outage with traditional telephone systems, often equipped with 24 hour battery back-up, nothing works better than a plain old fashioned rotary phone.
If you want to test it before hooking up connect a 9 volt battery to the two wires (often red and green) to see if you hear a click in the earpiece, also try blowing or talking into the microphone part and see if you hear something; it's called side-tone (i.e. you should be able to hear yourself slightly. (Side tone sometimes is called 'Spitch') if so the phone may work.
However depending on the original quality of the phone (Bell system standard/Western Elctric/ AE Co. Chicago, for example , whether it is in good condition and its model you may or may not get good quality voice transmission, both ways. Although judging by some of the cheap junk phones that have been sold and in some cases given away an older standard rotary phone that meets international standards may be better! I have pre-1950s phones that work just fine.
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terry wrote:

I don't understand why a rotary phone would be better. Touch tone phones are also powered by the loop so if the loop happens to be on battery the touch tone phone will still work just as well as a rotary phone.

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To test if it works, remove cover from wall jack, touch red and green wires from phone to same colors on jack. Listen for dial tone. If you get one, so far so good.
Next screw the red and green wires from the phone to the jack and test for outgoing and incoming phone calls. If it works, you can just leave it that way-- or attach an RJ11 plug to the phone so you can use it an any jack.
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Would you be able to use it for outgoing calls or just incoming?
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.
David makes good point ............. while you may able to dial local and long distance numbers, many/most voice-mail and automated answering and directory systems cannot respond to dial pulses once you have connected through the phone system to them. Many still say "Press X for such and such .... . Or stay on the line to be answered (Hopefully by a real live human being!!!!!).
BTW: Have seen one or two phone oddities from time to time. There was one European phone that had 12 rotary dial numbers on it. Also the standard speed of the dial pulses in North America and the UK used to be/is ten pulses per second. So it takes one second to dial zero! Old style rotary dial payphones outside sometimes used get pretty slow in cold weather and below about eight pulse per second the telephone equipment in the nice warm telephone building would misdial and one could get wrong numbers. And lose the money inserted! So sometimes one needed to push the dial back round to get enough speed.
Also the ratio of make/break of the dial pulses was slightly different in different countries. Recalling in the UK each pulse around 66% break, 34% make. In North America it was IIRC closer to 70% break etc.
So if this is some unusual manufacture of phone from say Chechloslovakia, or some made up abomination of a 'fake vintage' phone made in Taiwan or somewhere, expect anything in way of performance on a standard North American telephone connection! Which is, btw, why, at one time, Bell System and other companies discouraged the installation/ connection of 'other' phones to their lines; too many problems and trouble calls!
Oh. BTW don't think a rotary dial phone will work on any of the VOIP (internet connected) services such as Skype!!!!!!
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On 8/10/2008 9:32 AM terry spake thus:

I don't know for sure, but suspect that dialing "O" would get you through to the "operator" the way it does by pressing "O" with such systems (most are set up to reach some default number on that keypress).
--
"Wikipedia ... it reminds me ... of dogs barking idiotically through
endless nights. It is so bad that a sort of grandeur creeps into it.
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On Mon, 11 Aug 2008 12:19:35 -0700, David Nebenzahl

Yes.
Also I think with enough practice, one can learn to make touch-tone sounds with one's mouth. I think there was a guy on tv who could do that.
OT I get few junk phone calls now, but with one, I pressed 9, and a recording said something like, "You have been placed on our do-not-call list".
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Doubtful. You'd need to sets of vocal cords in order to generate the two simultaneous frequencies used to DTFM (tone-tone) dialing.
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On 8/11/2008 12:56 PM AZ Nomad spake thus:

But that's just what the Tuvan throat singers do: sing two tones simultaneously. Amazing stuff. Could probably be trained to do DTMF.
--
"Wikipedia ... it reminds me ... of dogs barking idiotically through
endless nights. It is so bad that a sort of grandeur creeps into it.
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On Mon, 11 Aug 2008 14:56:17 -0500, AZ Nomad

It's been done by whistling.
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/08/20/us/20engressia.html
I can whistle dual tones myself, although I've never tried using that talent for phone phreaking.
BTW, it's DTMF, not DTFM
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Which is their list of confirmed phone numbers to harass next.
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On Mon, 11 Aug 2008 14:56:40 -0500, AZ Nomad

You have a point but my phone had already rung and been answered by my machine or me. Wasn't I already on the do-harass list?
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mm wrote:

I saw that, but it's very difficult because each button generates a pair of tones.
OTOH, you can pulse dial from a touch tone phone by pressing the receiver hook the number of pulses for each digit. It's not as hard as it sounds. There's a lot of leeway in the pulse rate and duty cycle. If you've ever seen a phone in a public area with no dial or touch pad (to keep people from making outgoing calls) there's a way around this limitation.
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wrote:

And certainly worth learning when locked in a dungeon.

Then too.
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Both if it's working properly-- though as others have pointed out, there is no touch tone capability so you couldn't Press One For English..... Way back when, Radio Shack used to sell a pocket sized touch-tone generator-- or maybe hold the speaker of your cellie up to the mouthpiece of the old phone and enter them that way.
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I still have one of those RS touch-tone generators. Used to use it for phone patch operations when my 2-meter radio didn't have touch- tone capability.
Barry - N4BUQ
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I havn't used a rotary phone on a line, in ages. But very likely both. No child under 30 will know how to dial it.
--
Christopher A. Young
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On Aug 11, 10:37 am, "Stormin Mormon"

Simply untrue. I'm 22 and know about rotary phones. Hell, my cottage *still* doesn't have touchtone dialing.
Ian
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