Connecting Extension Cords

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I'm hoping someone can answer a questions about the best way to connect two extension cords. Both are 50' long. One is made of 14/3 wires. The other is made with 12/3 wires. My question is which one should be connected closest to the wall plug? The heavier gauge cord or should that be the one on the end of the connection as it would have less resistence?
Any comments and recommendations would be appreciated.
Thanks, Frank
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Doesn't make any difference. I just hope you won't be putting too big a load through it.

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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

It doesn't matter. The total resistance is the same, regardless of which way you connect them.
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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(At the risk of starting another "run or walk through rain" controversy:)
Series AC impedance (unlike DC resistance) is minimized by ordering the segment impedance to increase towards the load. So put the 14/3 after the 12/3 if you want to be perfect about it. But the AC impedance effect is trivial in this situation, so it doesn't really matter.
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Actually, that one *does* make a noticeable difference, unlike the extension cords.
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Then why did you mention it?
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On 28 Apr 2007 15:10:55 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Unless the device you need to power draws very little power and doesn't care about voltage, you really should get a proper 10/3 100 foot extension cord. Just the 50 foot 14/3 is going to have significant losses from end to end. Generally speaking, in home wiring, you don't want to run more than 50 feet from the service entrance with 14 gauge wire because of the voltage drop encountered. That means that a 14/3 extension cord is the minimum size for a 50 foot run if you plug it in AT the service entrance. If the power is already running through wiring to the outlet, then you really need the big expensive extension cord that you are hoping to avoid. Even a single 100 foot 12/3 cord would be somewhat preferable to the two cords you have now. You can get a 100 foot 10/3 extension at the big box stores for around $100. A 12/3 for about $50.
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Ummmmm.... 14ga copper wire has a resistance of 2.58 milliohms per foot, or 129 milliohms in fifty feet. Just how much of a loss do you suppose that's going to cause?
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On Sun, 29 Apr 2007 03:00:39 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

Enough. Go measure if you are not sure.
CWM
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Doug Miller wrote:

That's 258 milliohms per 50 feet (there's two conductors) It's enough to sometimes cause a 1.5 HP capacitor-start motor to fail to start. BTDT. It's probably not significant for anything else.
Bob
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wrote:

Depends on how much an energy hog the equipment is. Putting a 14/3 25' extensions cord on a small air compressor can cause blown breakers where no extension cord causes no problem. For a normal 3/8" drill you would probably not notice much of a difference at 100' if you were not working at the limit of the drill.
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On Sun, 29 Apr 2007 03:00:39 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

That would be 258.
VD on a 13A load would be 13 * .258 = 3.35V
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Terry wrote:

In other words, pretty insignificant.
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snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) says...

Power=I^2*R. R9*2, or 0.258 ohm. At 15 amps, the power loss over 50 feet is 58 watts.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Put the 12 guage first, then the 14. But the only reason is because it will be easier to move around with the lighter cord on the end. Electrically it is the same.
Bob
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I was going to say "wire nuts" but he probably wants to use the cords again. I like your logic, to put the lighter cord out where it's moving around.
Electrically, it's all the same. They are in series.
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Stormin Mormon wrote:

Ummmm.. no. Plugging one into the other constitutes a junction point, nothing more.
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100-foot contractor cord. That is what I did when I noticed the connectors on the strung-together cords I was using were getting rather warm to the touch. It is heavy, so it is a workout rolling it up and carrying it, but all the connections stay nice and cool now. Plus, the GFCI doesn't trip any more.
aem sends....
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On Apr 29, 1:10 am, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

No difference, from theoretical electrical viewpoint. And assuming the voltage is nominal 115 volts. What are the 12/3 or 14/3 extension cords to be used to power? If it's a single 60 watt inspection lamp bulb, volt drop insignificant. To try and power a 3 HP compressor or something which has an ampere load exceeding the rated ampacity of #14 AWG, possibly major volt drop problems especially during motor starts.
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Thanks for the quick replies. I appreciate the information. This is for a fence repair project so I'll be using the cords to power a battery charger (drill and screw driver) and a portable circular saw (about 13 amps) for short periods of time (long enough to cut 4" x 3/4" cedar boards to length).
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