Concrete - Using Quickcrete, how much to mix?

Page 2 of 2  

On Thu, 02 Oct 2008 06:51:37 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@invalid.com wrote:

Not true at all. This is typically 3500 or 4000 psi
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 02 Oct 2008 12:09:27 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:
:On Thu, 02 Oct 2008 06:51:37 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@invalid.com wrote: : :>I have always felt that Quickcrete (all brands), never contain enough :>raw cement. It's weak. : :Not true at all. This is typically 3500 or 4000 psi
OK, so I guess my problem was that I didn't add enough water.
Dan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Dan Musicant" wrote
Dan, I was hunting up thre quickcrete site and noted the forms for making a brick-look. Seemed easy. Is that what you are doing? I may do it here. The simple standard brick look seems right for this project.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 1 Oct 2008 17:17:01 -0400, in alt.home.repair you wrote:
:"Dan Musicant" wrote : :Dan, I was hunting up thre quickcrete site and noted the forms for making a :brick-look. Seemed easy. Is that what you are doing? I may do it here. :The simple standard brick look seems right for this project.
I'll try to describe what I did. Just next to my house there's a small rectangular patch of ground with plants. It's about 3.5 feet by 12 feet. On one long side is the side of the house, red brick. On the other 3 sides is a concrete surround, raised about 4 inches above the concrete patio. For some reason, one of the shorts sides was missing, and a very short portion of the long side. I put in the missing concrete today.
Dan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Dan Musicant" wrote

Ok thanks! Not the same project we need but interesting thread to me! Kind of the 'learn something new each day'.
I am wondering if those quickcrete molds (see, about 2x2) work well. They let you use quickcrete to make a sort of faux brick or stone walkway. I need something all along the ground level sunroom addition we made, or the mud from rain drops splatters the screens and glass. I was thinking in our case, a double wide set (about 4ft out) would meet our needs. The other idea was a 3ft or so suround of ground level trex decking but we havent the money for that just now.
I liked the look best of the simple 'brick' mold where you add their colorant to make it terra cotta. I am lucky as they have a store near me.
Now, to see (possibly in a separate post so as to not mess up yours) if any have any experience with this sort of need, and what they found.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
:"Dan Musicant" wrote : :> :Dan, I was hunting up thre quickcrete site and noted the forms for making :> a :> :brick-look. Seemed easy. Is that what you are doing? I may do it here. :> :The simple standard brick look seems right for this project. :> :> I'll try to describe what I did. Just next to my house there's a small :> rectangular patch of ground with plants. It's about 3.5 feet by 12 feet. :> On one long side is the side of the house, red brick. On the other 3 :> sides is a concrete surround, raised about 4 inches above the concrete :> patio. For some reason, one of the shorts sides was missing, and a very :> short portion of the long side. I put in the missing concrete today. : :Ok thanks! Not the same project we need but interesting thread to me! Kind :of the 'learn something new each day'. : :I am wondering if those quickcrete molds (see, about 2x2) work well. They :let you use quickcrete to make a sort of faux brick or stone walkway. I :need something all along the ground level sunroom addition we made, or the :mud from rain drops splatters the screens and glass. I was thinking in our :case, a double wide set (about 4ft out) would meet our needs. The other :idea was a 3ft or so suround of ground level trex decking but we havent the :money for that just now. : :I liked the look best of the simple 'brick' mold where you add their :colorant to make it terra cotta. I am lucky as they have a store near me. : :Now, to see (possibly in a separate post so as to not mess up yours) if any :have any experience with this sort of need, and what they found. : My back yard has some faux brick concrete work.
A tip or two: I used my wheelbarrow, a nice big 6 cubic footer. Use a garden hoe to mix, mix, mix the Quikcrete (or any other concrete mixture, even one you make yourself from Portland cement, sand and aggregate) with the water. I have 3 hoes, and one was perfect. The corners are rounded, so it doesn't scratch up my wheelbarrow. I cleaned the thing out afterward. I don't want my wheelbarrow looking like the one the plumbers used when they did my sewer lines!
My little project here came out pretty well. The portion I did actually looks a lot better than the stuff it was completing, which wasn't too sharp.
Dan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Dan Musicant" wrote

Good! That seems the cheapest easiest way to go for us. Thats a high concern as we've had $25,000 in repairs since since return (would be closer to $50,000 had we not been handy folks able to do much of it ourselves). Just bad luck of the draw with tenants but at least they kept us with enough from rent that we still own a house.

Grin, good point. I have a cat liter bucket I was going to try to use. One of those tidy-cat plastic things but it may be hard to mix properly in that. My only wheelbarrow is plastic and cracked at the bottom. My own fault there, when stacking the 2 cords of wood, I dropped some pieces from too far up and it caused that. Still works for all other needs.
Thinking... I have lots of construction grade (thick mill) plastic in big pieces I can use to line that wheelbarrow. If a little seeps though, it wont be a problem. Alternative is a bonus left from the renters, a large cat litter pan we found tucked in the rafters in the garage last week (grin). Seems that would work too.

Hehehe sometimes, thats the way of it. I've not done *much* work with cement but I have done small odd jobs over the years with little batches. Most 'recent' (if you can call 2000 'recent') before this was a nearby neighbor who's retired (limited fixed income), and crumbled back steps. Quite elderly with arthritis in the hips so this was both dangerous for him, and beyond his ability to fix. Other than replacing his steps with pre-made 'blocks' and just mortaring them in with a little cement we mixed up, all my other projects have had others do the 'cement detail' while I sorta watched if not doing some other task.
(OT but a sideline of mine from 1989-2001 was about 10 hours a month helping people with disabilities, make adaptions they needed but couldnt pay for. Mostly I built or adapted computers for the blind with screen reader software but i also did a fair amount of making ramps and things like that as part of a group. Many fine memories of working with and for people but (grin) not much personal cement work on my own part. Oh and yes, one of the members was a proper certified inspector and would run the permits for us if the particular job in his estimation required one. Like many things, you do what you can).
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
:"Dan Musicant" wrote :> "cshenk" wrote: : :> :Ok thanks! Not the same project we need but interesting thread to me! :> Kind :> :of the 'learn something new each day'. : :> My back yard has some faux brick concrete work. : :Good! That seems the cheapest easiest way to go for us. Thats a high :concern as we've had $25,000 in repairs since since return (would be closer :to $50,000 had we not been handy folks able to do much of it ourselves). :Just bad luck of the draw with tenants but at least they kept us with enough :from rent that we still own a house.
I used to rent this house along with other renters. After a while I was the senior guy and handled the interactions with the property managers. Our rent was cheap compared to the rest of the town because the house is old (just shy of 100 years), and not really kept up. Now that I've bought the house it's my hurculean task to get the house into shape to sell. It wouldn't be so tough if I had the money, but even if I did have the money to make this place ship shape, experienced GC's tell me I wouldn't get my money out, so I'm trying to be judicious in what I do. This house isn't the best for me to stay in, so I'm looking to sell. : :> A tip or two: I used my wheelbarrow, a nice big 6 cubic footer. Use a :> garden hoe to mix, mix, mix the Quikcrete (or any other concrete :> mixture, even one you make yourself from Portland cement, sand and :> aggregate) with the water. I have 3 hoes, and one was perfect. The :> corners are rounded, so it doesn't scratch up my wheelbarrow. I cleaned :> the thing out afterward. I don't want my wheelbarrow looking like the :> one the plumbers used when they did my sewer lines! : :Grin, good point. I have a cat liter bucket I was going to try to use. One :of those tidy-cat plastic things but it may be hard to mix properly in that. :My only wheelbarrow is plastic and cracked at the bottom. My own fault :there, when stacking the 2 cords of wood, I dropped some pieces from too far :up and it caused that. Still works for all other needs.
If you can swing it it might be a good investment to get a good steel wheelbarrow. I got mine on sale for $30 back around 2002. Might cost you almost twice that nowadays, but if on sale, probably cheaper. I use mine very frequently, and it was way worth the investment. Usually I haul yard waste, sometimes stone and brick, and just now, mixing and moving concrete. : :Thinking... I have lots of construction grade (thick mill) plastic in big :pieces I can use to line that wheelbarrow. If a little seeps though, it :wont be a problem. Alternative is a bonus left from the renters, a large :cat litter pan we found tucked in the rafters in the garage last week :(grin). Seems that would work too.
I have plastic sheeting too, but I wouldn't try to use it for concrete work. Just too messy, too much of a problem to mix, remix, adjust water/mix content to get the proper balance, remix, etc. : :> My little project here came out pretty well. The portion I did actually :> looks a lot better than the stuff it was completing, which wasn't too :> sharp. : :Hehehe sometimes, thats the way of it. I've not done *much* work with :cement but I have done small odd jobs over the years with little batches. :Most 'recent' (if you can call 2000 'recent') before this was a nearby :neighbor who's retired (limited fixed income), and crumbled back steps. :Quite elderly with arthritis in the hips so this was both dangerous for him, :and beyond his ability to fix. Other than replacing his steps with pre-made :'blocks' and just mortaring them in with a little cement we mixed up, all my :other projects have had others do the 'cement detail' while I sorta watched :if not doing some other task.
Concrete work isn't all that hard, but I started late in the afternoon (after 3 PM), had never done any concrete work before and wasn't at all sure I was going to get done before darkness (~7 PMish), and so I felt rushed. Besides, I had no realistic idea how much time I had to work with the mixture before it would start going off. Also, I was nervous about mixing two different batches, working in the first before mixing the second and worried that this strategy wasn't wise. All in all it made me work more feverishly than I normally would and I sure felt the strain by the end as I worked and worked to smooth the cement, which was all the tougher becuase I mixed much to dry. So, my back was really hurting by the time I was done. I just wanted to do the work last Wednesday, made up my mind to do so and did. It came out OK, all in all. Not perfect, but OK for this. : :(OT but a sideline of mine from 1989-2001 was about 10 hours a month helping :people with disabilities, make adaptions they needed but couldnt pay for. :Mostly I built or adapted computers for the blind with screen reader :software but i also did a fair amount of making ramps and things like that :as part of a group. Many fine memories of working with and for people but :(grin) not much personal cement work on my own part. Oh and yes, one of the :members was a proper certified inspector and would run the permits for us if :the particular job in his estimation required one. Like many things, you do :what you can).
There are programs like that around here. I could probably even get them to help me, but I haven't contacted them. I've been a DIY guy for years and years and tend to just dig in and do things myself. It's actually pretty amazing some of the projects I've managed to do on my own.
Dan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Dan Musicant" wrote

Understood. Perhaps you might be able to rent it out? Then again you probably have too much of your cash tied up in it to really do that.

Naw, not enough things need it that the old plastic one can't handle. Cement mixing is about the only thing it's no good for now. Looks like the deep cat liter pan would turn the trick well enough. It's one of those overtall ones.

Hey, that works fine!

Habitat for Humanity. Yes, might be able to get some help there!
Mom's way to make money raising us 3 kids (divorced) was what is today called 'house flipping'. She didnt go too crazy moving us around, but we'd often move to another part of the same school district to another house etc.
As a result, I'm more handy than most in some projects. What I know nothing about, I just read up on here, but when I can help, I give detailed as I can reports. Some things are just too hard to describe (how to set in a window, how to rebuild a kitchen cabinet) but I do lots of stuff or have, before the back problems kicked in.
Projects I have done: wallpapering (including the insides of round cornered medicine cabinets which is a pesky thing but tells a seller *quality* right away is in all the details of the house), painting (especially detail work), wood staining, cabinet building or rebuilding, antiquing, chair railing, faux wainscot (chair rail with a box framed below to look like wood panels and whole bottom in a contrasting paint), refinished wood floors, built exterior decks, laid floor tile, built non-load bearing walls to frame out rooms in a (once we were done) 'finished basement', installed or replaced toilets (traps put in by by plummer as well as some of the water leads if new ones being added), built in floor to ceiling shelving, helped hang doors, upholstery, rescreened just about anything or added screening where there was none to many a porch, installed screen doors, and probably at least 50 other things that dont come to mind just now.
Generally if it was made of wood or paper or needed fine painting, it was my job (grin). It never even occured to me when I became an adult, that I could have applied for jobs using those skills. Then again, it was kinda hard back then for women to get work doing such. Times though have changed. I still get a snicker about how Mom would :schmooze: the guys at the hardware stores until they caught on that she wasnt dumb at all and start asking her for advice on stuff!
One truely classic memory. Fellow who'd been house hunting had come to see one we were selling but he didnt have enough money for it. He wanted to put in the same sort of faux chair rail and we met him quizzing the store fellow who was frustrated as he wasnt sure about the details. Then he saw me. Eyes lit up and he said, 'so simple, even a child can do it'. I laughed as he knew those boxes were mine (Mom was never bashful about showing off what parts were done by which kid). I took him to show the right wood and they let me have enough to frame out one box so I measured and cut one then brad nailed it to some broken drywall. Took about 20 mins to make a perfect one and had a small sorta 'crowd' watching this 13YO kid show how to do it. I even showed him how to cut the inner corners of a chair rail spot where the corners meet, then how to do one where the corner juts out (same skill as baseboards, just shows more to the eye so gotta be neater).
And here at my home? My husband put up the ceiling molding. I didn't have the heart to tell him he put it up, upside down (grin). I turned it into a feature with another bit of trim! So much more peaceful that way!
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 01 Oct 2008 13:01:45 -0700, Dan Musicant ( snipped-for-privacy@privacy.net) wrote:

Concrete is cheap. If this is something more than fence posts, don't try to save 4 bucks using rocks. If I was figuring 1.5 cu/ft I would get 4 60s and have one left over if I was right but you don't want to be 1.45 yards in and run out. (or just put in too much water and need some more concrete mix to get it right). Kept in a drywall bucket with a good top it lasts quite a while if you don't mix it up..
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 01 Oct 2008 20:27:25 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:
:On Wed, 01 Oct 2008 13:01:45 -0700, Dan Musicant ( snipped-for-privacy@privacy.net) :wrote: :
:>wrote: :> :>:Dan Musicant wrote: :>:> This is my first crack at concrete. Small job and I figure I'll need a :>:> bit over 1.5 cubic feet, and I'm planning to do the work this :>:> afternoon. I've almost finished my forms and am reading the :>:> instructions in my Reader's Digest Complete DIY book. :>:> :>:> I read the instructions on the bag of Quickcrete (60 lb.) I bought, :>:> and it says to use 4 quarts of water with it, maximum 5 quarts. :>:> There's no mention of how many cubic feet (or inches, I figure a :>:> cubic foot is 1725 cubic inches) I can expect to get out of a 60 lb. :>:> bag. I don't want to mix much more than I'll need, and figure a sure :>:> don't want to mix less. How do I determine how much to mix? :>:> :>:> To extend the mix, I figure to put in some crushed concrete or rocks I :>:> have. I have tons of that stuff around (maybe literally!), and figure :>:> I'll crush some with a sledge hammer. Not much, just some near the :>:> bottom of the pour. :>:> :>: :>:Get another bag. Mix up one bag. If it's not enough, mix up the second. :>: :>:Unmixed concrete doesn't keep very long. It sucks the moisture out of the :>:air. :>: :>:Hint 1: A wheelbarrow makes an excellent mixing venue. :>:Hint 2. Start mixing with much less water than you think you'll need. Add a :>:little bit at a time. It is VERY easy to use too much water. :>: :>OK, thanks. I'll go buy another bag. Even so, I figure I'll have to add :>rock, I probably have a couple of tons in the yard! I have to break up :>some, though. Did some already.l :> :>I wish I was doing something as easy as a post, It's actually a tricky :>little border. The one that's there for some reason they didn't complete :>it and the rest was done with unmortared bricks, just stacked there. :>Tired of realigning the bricks I decided to complete the raised concrete :>border, which requires forms and some care so the whole thing matches. :> :>I have a wheelbarrow I can use. I saw a crew do some concrete work in my :>yard around a year ago and have an idea how to go about it. They did a :>trenchless sewer replacement. I enjoyed watching them do the concrete. :> :>Dan : :Concrete is cheap. If this is something more than fence posts, don't :try to save 4 bucks using rocks. If I was figuring 1.5 cu/ft I would :get 4 60s and have one left over if I was right but you don't want to :be 1.45 yards in and run out. (or just put in too much water and need :some more concrete mix to get it right). Kept in a drywall bucket with :a good top it lasts quite a while if you don't mix it up..
Yes, it was pretty cheap. I got two 60 lb. bags of Quikcrete concrete mix for under $5. I decided I didn't really need 1.5 cu. ft., more like .75. I did put some rocks in there, but it turned out I really didn't need those because I had a fair amount left over (mixed).
Dan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.