Compact Fluorescent light bulbs?

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I have been using them for several years. They do save power. The light output from most of the newer ones is very good. The older ones was not. Two disadvantages. 1. They start out dim and get bright after a minute. That can be annoying when you run into a room to find your keys and can not see well at first. 2. In very cold weather they dont always work right, they flicker and sometimes never get real bright. In the house they are fine, but in the garage, I tend to swap half of them with standard bulbs in the coldest months of the year.
One other thing. I have not had real good life from the GE brand. They burn out way too fast. The other brands have been fine. I'd avoid GE.
PS. I have one in my barn that is on 24/7. It uses 9 watts. Just a dim light for my horses to see where they are at night. That uses 216 watts per day, which figures to about 20 cents a week. If that was a standard 40W bulb. I'd be using 960 watts per day, which would cost about 85 cents a week. (one of these days I am going to put a light sensor on that thing so it turns off during the day). So far that light has burned 24/7 for one and a half years with no problems. I used to use those "under the kitchen counter" 20 inch florescent fixtures in the barn. They too would burn 24/7. They used double the wattage, and the bulbs burned out yearly, not to mention these bulbs cost considerably more, and the fixtures filled up with bugs.
Mark
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You mean 9 watts of power x 24 hours = 216 Wh, ie 0.216 kWh of energy.

A motion detector with incandescent bulbs might use less energy.
Nick
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On 28 Oct 2005 02:44:27 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@ece.villanova.edu wrote:

YES. And at around 12 cents / KWH thats roughly 12 cents every 4 days, or about 20 cents a week.

That would totally drive the horses bonkers, and the light would still go on during the day because it's not real bright in the barn.
What I need is a photocell, but it MUST be outside to work. I already tried a screw in (the socket) type, it never shut off, too dark in the barn. Thats why I have not installed it yet, I will have to route a cable outdoors, put a box and the sensor. Not too complicated, but my sliding doors are in the way, so it will have to go to the opposite side of the barn, so by the time I finish, I will have used at least 50ft of cable.

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It doesn't bother ours. Then again, they are used to low-flying airplanes.

You might look into X10 motion detector fixtures. Ours can send a signal at dawn and dusk. Perhaps some gadget can integrate that to inhibit an indoor X10 light during the day.
Nick
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A good way to estimate the annual cost of operation for any electrical device which is in continuously operation is to "convert" the watts to dollars. This is based upon an assumption that the cost of electricity plus taxes is about 11 to 12 cents per kilowatt hour. So, your 9 watt bulb costs about $9 per year in operating costs, assuming 24/7 service.
If you are getting electricity at a cost which is significantly different from $0.11 to $0.12 per kWh, then it is very easy to mentally compute an adjusted annual operating cost estimate. Likewise, it is easy to estimate the annual cost if the device isn't operating 24/7.
Math: 1 watt x 24 hr/day x 365 days/year x 1kWh/1000watt-hr x $0.115/kWh = $1.01/year)
Gideon
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