Coil nailers for cedar shingle siding

Hello,
I'm going to reside my house with red cedar shingles (16 squares at 4.25" exposure), and I'd like to use stainless steel nails in a coil nailer. I see that there are two different types of nails available in coils:
siding nails with a 0.090" shank and a 13/64" head roofing nails with a 0.120" shank and a 3/8" head
I assume that for cedar shingle siding, the siding nails would be better, but would it be OK to use the roofing nails? I'll be blind nailing, of course. The big question, will a generic roofing coil nailer (HF 54700) shoot siding nails? Obviously the shank diameter and head size are different, but I only need to use 1.5" long nails, so the roofing nailer can handle the length.
Thanks, Wayne
P.S. I assume that 304 stainless stail is adequate for siding, since I'm not building a house boat?
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Wayne Whitney wrote:

Power nailing isn't suitable for cedar shakes or shingles imo. Far too easy and prevelant for the nail to either not fully set or to pull in too far as the cedar is really soft.
Depending on what you're putting them on/over, use the proper length shingle nail--either 3D, 4D, 5D galvanized to get the full penetration of the nail. IMO, SS is an unnecessary expense in this application. I've removed 50+ year old cedar shingle roofs and the galvanized nails are still fine---in fact, I've reused a lot of them (yes, I'm cheap :) ).
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We always used stainless staples for siding applications. Like Duane says, nails are a pain to drive properly. Unlike Duane says, if you don't want streaks all over your new siding, use stainless. Roofing nail shank dimensions will split your shingles, so I'd go with the siding nails if there's no other choice. Check your manual for the capacities of your tool. Tom
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tom wrote:

I guess maybe that comes from being in a relatively dry location--it just doesn't happen here...

Good point I hadn't addressed....a coil roofing nailer is designed for composition shingle roofing nails which are _totally_ unsuited for cedar. As you say, they have too large a shank and will undoubtedly cause a bunch of splits plus the heads are too big and will either not seat solid or cause breaks too frequently.
As we've never had anything but cedar, I refer colloquially refer to the 3D to 5D galvanized as "shingle nails" as that's what I grew up with... :)
I still think power nailing and cedar shingles/shakes don't go together. Dad had house roof replaced "professionally" after the big hail in '95 and they used the stinkin' staples...I've re-nailed at least half since and _all_ corners and ridges and still lose a few every time the wind blows (which is essentially constant here).
Here's a link for OP that has recommendations--they do suggest SS or Al and allow staples, but the nails are, as I suggested, 3D to 5D, chosen based on necessary length.
http://www.cedarbureau.org/installation/wall_manual/page05.htm
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Thanks, I am familiar with that link. For hand nailing, they suggest 3D to 5D box nails. I just measured some 3D box nails--0.08" shank diameter, 13/64" head diameter. So the coil siding nails at 0.090" shank and 13/64" head diameter are a pretty good match.
My main question is whether a generic roofing nailer designed for 3/8" head 0.120" shank diameter nails would shoot 13/64" head 0.090" shank diameter nails. Has anybody tried this?
Yours, Wayne
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Wayne Whitney wrote:

Don't think it will work reliably, if at all. Pneumatic nailers are pretty unforgiving for the specific fasteners they're designed to handle. If the manufacturer of the nailer you propose to use doesn't have what you're looking for listed as available for the nailer, I'd said it's unlikely to be satisfactory. The siding nails are about the right size, granted.
I still personally think power nailing cedar shingles isn't the way to go, but maybe that's just me. If you can get them to seat reliably at the proper depth, have at it.
For only 16 sq, I just can't see any overwhelming need. Did the barn roof w/ one helper (approx 66 sq) two years ago. Used shakes instead of shingles 'cause I got "a deal". What w/ trimming required to get straight edges on the shakes application was quite a bit slower than shingles although used 10-inch setback instead of 5 so that sped it up some.
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