Circuit tester

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The
Don't know, and don't want to know. The OP just wanted some help straightening out some outlet wiring issues.
And now he has to replace all his outlets with GFI's and buy hairdryers.
SHEESH !
AMUN
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the
Not all of them. Just the first in the daisy chain. The rest will still be protected from ground fault.
It is not allowed in new construction, granted. But it makes a 2-wire receptacle system much much safer and it is allowed specifically under those conditions with proper stickers affixed. Even plain jane 3-prong receptacles with no ground wire are allowed if the outlet is GFCI protected and so labeled as GFCI protected and no equipment ground.
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to
a
issues.
those
receptacles
I do admit and agreed earlier in this thread that "it's still better than nothing" But not by much.
But the one main caveat of that solution is that some equipment really does not like being on ground faults, (computers,tv power supplies, refrigerator motors, UPS's etc.) and can pop a gfi for no valid reason. Such things are usually in plastic isolated cases and make gfi protection almost silly as there is no possible risk of shock, unless someone is really begging for it.
Those items usually come with polarized plugs, and are designed to be protected by a dedicated ground and fuse/breaker.
Even lightning storms in the area can flip a gfi from transients in the AC line.
If the main gfi is in another room upstream of the outlet, there will be a lot of worn carpeting while constantly running around guessing which one tripped, and resetting them.
But the fact remains that the OP's real problem is best solved by simply replacing all the wiring with romex with a ground.
Or at least first making sure that all existing outlets are wired as properly as possible. (hot and neutral where they should be)
AMUN
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OP here again >>>>>>.
I knew this topic was a can of worms.
I just checked the wiring I did in the garage add on and in the attic which had no electric when I moved in 30+ years ago.
Based on the same GB tester results, only 2 lights show = PERFECT HOOKUP. So I am not totally devoid of skills.
The problem is with the rest of the ORIGINAL house wiring. I have made additiions to that wiring and it was done BLACK TO BLACK and WHITE TO WHITE since the colors of the old original Romex were visible.
As I said, a garage was added on and the original wiring in the original panel ( now a junction box ) was extended over the garage ceiling to the new outside wall of the garage. The junction box has been plastered over, but I am sure my friend and I (he knew more than I did at the time ) were not that stupid as to mix BLACK AND WHITE wires in splicing the connections.
The ORIGINAL panel had 4 15amp breakers with NO MAIN breaker - 60 amp service.
Thanks to all for all the help.
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I had insufficient information from your post to provide an accurate answer. But all along, the two glowing lights could be an example of ground leakage from an appliance to a three prong outlet not connected back, by safety ground, to the mains breaker box. This is only speculation. But considering a shortage of useful responses, I offer this up as speculation.
Zing wrote:

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OP here again >>>>>>>>>>
I was going to start a new thread since the info below is a new wrinkle but decided to post here with something I found on the ACE HARDWARE site while trying to do some research on the 3 lights that I mentioned previously giving me a BRIGHT YELLOW lite and a DIM RED AND CLEAR lites - all three lit at one time.
I found this instruction as I said on the ACE site in an FAQ on HOW TO use the CIRCUIT ANALYZER with the 3 lites >>>>>>>>>>>
" What is the easiest way to test an outlet?
Use a receptacle analyzer. Leave the power on, but make sure nothing is plugged into any outlet on the circuit, and turn off all switches on the circuit. Now, plug the analyzer into the outlet. A series of lights will tell you if the outlet is wired correctly and working." <<<<<<<<
I know of no one that does this or ever did this when using the tester.
If it is that important, I think it should be put into the instructions with the tester.
Does that instruction make any sense ? Might this be my problem vs something more serious ?
TIA again
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A light fully glowing would be 120 volts. A light extinguished would be near zero volts. A light glowing partially would be something like 60 volts. But 'something like 60 volts' must not exist between any two wires. So what is leaking half of the 120 volts? That is basically the question to be asked. Nothing should be leaking half of the 120 volts.
BTW, that tester cannot report a good wiring job. It can only report a failure; not a good condition. But in your case, something is leaking 'something like 60 volts' where there should only be near zero volts or 120 volts. Maybe an appliance. Maybe a wiring problem. But definitely a problem. Maybe the symptoms of a minor problem or maybe symptoms of something serious. Further information is necessary which is why I would be using my multimeter to learn more. Start by measuring voltage between every pair of those three receptacle connections - 3 voltage measurements recorded for this and all other electrically adjacent receptacles.
Zing wrote:

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Amun posted for all of us... I don't top post - see either inline or at bottom.

Yes totally.

Cite the manufacturers.

Like everything else in life. Local codes vary. The AHJ is the judge.

NEW construction REQUIRES a ground; so therefore this assertion is bogus.

Now you start to catch on...

No, he can do it the right way.

Duh!
He also has to make certain the line and load sides are correct plus many other things.. Why don't you keep quiet about things you know nothing about?

--

Tekkie


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Well to be honest, as you know the house has no ground wire you shouldn't be surprised that the neon lights are not showing "normal". But as all of those testers have 3 prongs, how are you even getting them into the 2 prong outlets ????
If you have 3 prong outlets, no doubt they were changed somewhere (by a handy homeowner?) along the line and some have the polarity reversed on the existing hot and neutral, or worse.
BTW the old style paper/tar romex with no ground was common in a lot of areas as late as the 1960's And is still legal (grandfathered) where it was installed.
But as most times it went in with 60A services, using fuses, and usually only one outlet per room, you may want to think about doing some major electrical upgrading soon to handle all the electrical toys that now exist.
AMUN
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I have the same kind of tester. They are cheap and the light from one LED bleeds to the other light's section in the tester. The one that is very bright is the only one that is to be read as lit. The rest are not lit, and what you have is a tester that is reading correctly.... open ground.
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