Change convector radiators to cast iron??


After having a new oil-fired hot water boiler installed, Im considering the value in replacing some of my convector radiators with cast-iron. But, not sure if it's worth the hassle. Which would feel more comfortable and/or be cheaper to run in the long run? For example, convectors require shorter more frequent boiler firings to keep the temp steady in the house. And although cast-iron radiators require longer boiler firing time to heat up, they stay hot longer. Sounds like its an even wash either way, but your comments are appreciated.
-Theodore.
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After having a new oil-fired hot water boiler installed, Im considering the value in replacing some of my convector radiators with cast-iron. But, not sure if it's worth the hassle. Which would feel more comfortable and/or be cheaper to run in the long run? For example, convectors require shorter more frequent boiler firings to keep the temp steady in the house. And although cast-iron radiators require longer boiler firing time to heat up, they stay hot longer. Sounds like its an even wash either way, but your comments are appreciated.
-Theodore.
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Only some? If they are on the same zone you can wind up with uneven heat. While I personally like cast iron radiators for the heat retention, I'd not bother with the change. I don't see any energy savings as a Btu is a Btu,but there may be a little comfort difference in some places if you have any drafts.
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Cast iron radiators take up a lot more space than convectors (especiall fllorboard convectors). You'll miss that space if you convert.
--
Peace,
BobJ



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No, they don't. Take the same space http://www.slantfin.com/product-rhino-cast.html http://www.usboilerco.com/radiator/58100.cfm http://www.runtalnorthamerica.com/residential_radiators/index.html
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I'm not so concerned with the space they'll take up. More concerned about if they'll make it *feel* warmer, and at what cost. I'm also wary of the uneven effect it may cause.
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For example, this webpage talks about "radiant temperature," as comfort level.
http://www.taunton.com/finehomebuilding/how-to/qa/baseboard-vs-radiator-heat.aspx?nterms=6 5792,62152
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On Oct 5, 7:40pm, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

To "feel" warmer raise the temp, if that all you want radiators will be a waste. Baseboards depending on type run at higher boiler temps, mixing the two is for a pro to run numbers, a pro that has done it with happy customers.
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Every time your boiler runs, it blows heat out the chimney and it has to heat up the pipes and the radiators before you feel any warmth at all. Heating all this metal, water and air costs money. Over the last few years, radiator manufactures have made radiators with less metal, holding less water to be most economic. Cast iron radiators got left behind as they absorb so much heat and cost more to run. Perry
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Since when " left behind" any heat to the radiator is heat released to the home. I live with radiators and no boiler pro here we have talked to advocates getting rid of them. Your efficency is the boiler. Now in floor radiant has the heat lower and under you.
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Think about the physics of what you wrote. Where does that heat go once in the radiators? How would they cost more to run? They may be less responsive, but the thermal mass is a plus. If it goes into the water and the metal, it is going to eventually come back out.
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My reply goes like this - its spring time, its morning, the heating has raised the room temperature, its comfortable. the sun comes out, the temperature goes up, the room is too hot, the radiators are still delivering heat. You open the window because its too hot. Its evening, it gets cold, you wait for the room to heat up, a pressed steel radiator, responds quicker, the cast iron one has to heat its self first, then the air in the room.
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On Oct 4, 11:45pm, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

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On Oct 4, 10:45pm, snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

It's mostly a quality of life / preference issue. I have lived with the cast iron radiators for the last 12 years and like them a lot. The heat is indeed even, and you can put things on them to warm up - e.g., put your cold wet gloves and boots on it when you come in, or put your slippers on it so they'll be toasty when you get up in the morning, etc. They do take up space, complicate arranging furniture and are kinda hard to clean. Mine also clank a bit. A couple of HVAC people have told me they are the best but people don't install them now in new construction due to the upfront cost. --H
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