Chair Repair Question

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I have a LazyBoy recliner chair that needs a fix. I will try to describe the chair, and its problem.
The chair has wooden arms with wooden supports three vertical, round 'rods' (my word) each about 10" long and about 2" diameter. The 'rods' go thru round holes in the chair arms. When originally built, the 'rods' look like they were made to stay in the arms by having a small wooden wedge forced into the 'rods' so as to make them stay in place in the arms. Wouldn't you know - the arms have begun to pull off the 'rods'. Put it another way - the 'rods' now portrude thru the arm holes and stick up about an inch.
There - I hope I have described the problem well enough that someone can advise me how to fix this. I think the proper way to fix the rods would be to remove the wooden wedge from each rod, and replace it with another slightly bigger wedge to basically make the rod stay in the arm's hole. Plus maybe a little glue?
I am not a carpenter, so I can't really do this. But I am wondering - is there a glue or some other substance that I could coat onto the part of the rod that is sticking up (about 1/2") that would hold the rod in place - maybe even swell the rod to make it a tight fit again?
Thanks JW
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On 1/25/2015 8:29 AM, snipped-for-privacy@cal.com wrote:

Gorilla Glue is one option. Please do some internet research on the product. Works fine in many situations. This might be one such.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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That could work, depending upon your skill and how much the hole and "rod" differ in size. And yes, use glue. The _best_ glue for the purpose would be thickened epoxy but it sounds as if that might be beyond your skill level; plain old yellow glue would work if hole/"rod" are not too far off in diameter..
A more sure way of accomplishing the fix would to be to drill a hole horizontally through one side of the arm, through the "rod" and part way through he other side of the arm. Insert - with glue - a dowel of the same size as the hole.
--

dadiOH
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On Sunday, January 25, 2015 at 9:55:24 AM UTC-5, dadiOH wrote:

From what's described, the plan to wedge and glue sounds right. He plans on removing the wedge that's there, putting in a new wooden one. IDK how easy they are to get out, but if they won't easily come out, might another option be to get some small steel wedges and just drive them in without taking old ones out? Do they make such a thing?
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On 1/25/2015 9:55 AM, dadiOH wrote:

I had been thinking pilot hole, grease, and wood or machine screw.
Small wedges. Apologies, delted the post with the question. Yes, sold for tightening hammer or axe handles.
For now, I think gorilla glue has a good chance of success. I have repaired chairs with gorilla glue. I've learned to glue, and sit with the repair for several minutes. The glue expands, and I had to use a razor to trim off the glue that expanded out, before it hardened.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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In

There are small metal wedges that are used to repair loose wooden hammer handles.
I just did a Google search for "hammer repair wedge" and saw a lot of links. Then I clicked on Google Images for the same search and saw a lot of images and examples there too.
Apparently, they sell these at hardware stores and maybe Home Depot, Lowes, etc.
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On Sunday, January 25, 2015 at 10:35:26 AM UTC-5, TomR wrote:

That's what I was thinking about, knew I saw them somewhere, but couldn't think of an example.

Yes, sounds like it might be an option. Unless the old ones are falling out, I'd try to find a suitable metal size one to drive in beside it. Of course you don't want one that's too big....
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On 1/25/2015 8:29 AM, snipped-for-privacy@cal.com wrote:

You have the right idea and I agree with what others already said. Epoxy or Gorilla Glue is best for this because it does not shrink like regular wood glue would when it dries.
Swelling is probably a temporary fix at best. The wood will dry out again in short time and the problem will return
If you can get the existing wedge out and put a larger one in place, that would work. You'd also get good results if you added another wedge along side
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On 01/25/2015 07:29 AM, snipped-for-privacy@cal.com wrote:

Though the others indeed have given you the proper advice I tend to do things differently.
I have had similar problems here and simply pounded everything back in place then from below (where it does not show) drilled small pilot holes and "permanently" attached the dowels with drywall screws.
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Stormin Mormon wrote: ...

we must be tough on our chairs as i had to redo all of them after first using GG.
and yes, i followed the directions...
the 2nd time i used epoxy with some flex in it that was wood compatible. no failures since then.
songbird
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On Sun, 25 Jan 2015 09:12:16 -0500, Stormin Mormon

Ace Hardware.. It'll cost you a "Hamilton"
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On 1/25/2015 12:12 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

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On Sun, 25 Jan 2015 17:45:05 -0500, Stormin Mormon

Anything intelligent to say, Stormy???
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On 1/25/2015 8:13 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

One word: Just (1) did (2).
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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On Sun, 25 Jan 2015 22:14:32 -0500, Stormin Mormon

I call it one word.
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On 1/25/2015 11:21 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

Call it what you want. Two sets of letters separated by a space is considered by most to be two words.
- . Christopher A. Young learn more about Jesus . www.lds.org . .
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On Sun, 25 Jan 2015 08:29:03 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@cal.com wrote:

Doesn't LazyBoy have a very good reputation (or is it that the advertising has fooled me?)
Anyhow, I'd try their customer service and see what they say.
I myself could not understand what and where the rods were, but they know more about their chairs than I do.

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I wonder if they are not too big and a nail or two of the right length might be better. If he can't get the old wedge out, or doesn't want to for some reason.

I think I bought one of these once, but I like wooden wedges for hammer handles better. I think the metal one worked in one case but was too thick for most cases.
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wrote:

They make epoxy with flex in it??? Do you remember the brand?
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On 1/25/2015 8:29 AM, snipped-for-privacy@cal.com wrote:

If you have a mallet, some toothpicks and Gorilla wood glue, you may have a chance :o) I would even split a couple of toothpicks, soak them in water for a few minutes to soften them. Apply a couple of pieces of toothpick to the top of the supports and then glue (follow instructions on the glue carefully) and push them into the hole in the arm. Smack the arm down carefully until top of rod is flush with arm. Watch for glue oozing and wipe it carefully. Would also help if there is crusty old glue on the support to scrape that off before beginning the repair. Good luck, and let us know.
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