Cement/mortar mixer

I need a cement/mortar mixer. Should I bite the bullet, and buy a larger gas powered unit, or will a small electric suffice. I need to do 40' of block wall, stone over it, and various and odd stone and cement work around a remote cabin.
How good do the small electrics last? Is their capacity too small to mess with? Would it be more efficient to use a bigger one, and mix my own portland, sand, lime, and aggregate rather than buy sacks of pre-mix?
Steve
Steve
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I've borrowed an electric that is about 15 years old and does a lot of work. Still works just fine and for the job you want should be ideal.
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On Thu, 27 Jul 2006 17:45:30 -0700, "Steve B"

I don't know about mortar mixers but I have an old Builder Square (RIP) electric concrete mixer I have mixed many yards of concrete with over the years and it is still goinhg. I am not sure how you would break it. It is not that good with mortar tho. It seems to hang up in the drum and not mix right. That is why mortar mixers use paddles
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If you are the only one working than you won't need the capacity of a gas machine. 40' wall is small enough you could just wheel barrow mix. I have found that a wheel barrow is about the capacity of electrics I have used anyway.
Pre mix is the only way to go. Hauling in the sand and then the stones then shovel both into a mixer trying to keep each batch the same so it will look the same finished is time consuming and expensive. Just break a bag into the mixer/wheelbarrow and go.
If more than 3 people and larger projects then a gas is the way to go. I have an 8 HP mixer. I can dump in 4-80lb bags of premix, add water, and haul out 2 wheel barrows of concrete in less than 4 min. But need at least 3 people to keep up with the machine.
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Steve B wrote:

I have had good luck with small electric mortar mixers. They are great when working alone and very reliable. I don't like per mixed mortar mix very much. Much better results with individual bags of portland and lime. If making concrete you can mix sand and portland and then pour it into a tub and add stones or gravel.
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I bought this one: http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber1979
I'm no mason but this mixer was the right size for mixing up mud for an adobe wall and mortar for a Kiva fireplace. I had just the right amount that I could get it into place before anything set. If you're looking at it for footings, it'll prolly be too small. It's worked well so far and for $189 I figured I couldn't go wrong. Cheers, cc
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James "Cubby" Culbertson wrote:

"This general duty cement mixer handles stucco, mortar and concrete. Also great for inoculating seeds and mixing feeds. All-steel unit is rugged enough for construction and farm use. Large wheels for easy maneuverability. Double insulated."
The seed inoculation thing gets me. How does it do that?
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Im assuming that you wil need to mix the concrete for the footing since you say it is a remote cabin... the footing for a 40' of block wall is somewhere in the neighborhood of 5 yards of concrete this is just a shot in the dark not knowing how high what size block ect. and is probably a very low number. The quanity is not so much the problem ( although that is ALOT of material ) as the time factor in mixing to set up. Mixing this amount of concrete for a footing will leave you with what are cold joints, this is when the concrete drys to the point where the next section does not bond well with the previous. It may seem as though it will be okay but this area is weak and will ruin the overall strength of the entire footing and wouldnt you just love to mix all that concrete and next year have to jack hammer it out???? Yes you can do it in sections but they must be doweled into eachother and again you have a joint every so many feet which in a footing is asking for trouble. My advice get a concrete truck in there and or a pumper for the footing. All the other items you mentioned wil be served well by an electric mixer from homedepot or lowes these little things are work horses, yes you can use a cocrete mixer to mix mortar. But as mentiond above I would buy a dry premix masons blend. In CA there is a product called Spec Mix and it is excatally that a masonary mix that meets Los Angeles spec (highest in the nation) for mortar. This will save you in the long run because you would still need to either have delivered or haul youself several tons of sand in addition to probably a pallet of portland cement and a half of lime for the block work alone not to mention the stone...
Steve B wrote:

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EBAY to buy and then sell.
On Thu, 27 Jul 2006 17:45:30 -0700, "Steve B"

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