Ceiling rafters attached to header

I have a kitchen/dining combo room divided by an arch. The arch is a 4 X 12 header that I want to move into the attic. I want to butt the ceiling rafters into the header beam so that the ceiling is complete flush, no arch.
I have used joist hangers on decks before for similar applications but the bottom of the joist hanger always protrudes a little below the joists/rafters.
On this application I will be drywalling over the bottom of the ceiling rafters so the hangers will interfear will the drywall laying flush. Any suggestions on how to attach the ceiling rafters to the header beam so that the bottom surface is complete flush for the drywall? Will end nailing the ceiling rafters to the header beam be enough to support the ceiling rafters, drywall, and insulation? The ceiling rafters are 10' long.
Thanks -------------------------------------
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Option 1: Make the header a standard construction with king and cripple studs. This is the usual method, but it will require opening up the wall.
Option 2: Use the joist hangers, but carve out the back of the wallboard.
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Steve Bell
New Life Home Improvement
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on 3/7/2009 9:17 AM (ET) SteveBell wrote the following:

Option 3: Rabbet the joist ends to accommodate the thickness of the hangers.
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Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
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That is the best solution. Only take a few minutes with a router and won't weaken the joists.
Harry K
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But it weakens the header. That's worse that weakening the joists.
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Steve Bell
New Life Home Improvement
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SteveBell wrote:

I think he's talking about removing a 1/4" or so off the bottom of the joist, and just the few inches of length needed to accommodate the bottom of the joist hanger. I do this, but with a hand planer rather than router.
You want to recess the bottom of the hanger a bit rather than aiming for flush on new construction since the joist is going to shrink. You'll see an 1/8" to 1/4" gap between the bottom of the hanger and the joist in many basements.
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OK. That makes sense. I though he wanted to rabbet a groove into the header to receive the end of the joist. It was obviously too early.
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Steve Bell
New Life Home Improvement
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*I saw ripped plywood strips nailed to the underside of the joists to meet the thickness of some heavy gauge hangers on a job once.
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