Ceiing Mounted, AC Powered, Wired Together Smoke Alarms: Suggestions, Please ?

Hello,
Have three ceiling mounted, AC powered, smoke detectors which need replacement after 8 years or so.
These have the additional feature that if one goes off, they all do, as they are wired "together"
Cost is not a concern.
Are there any "semi-professional" models available rather than the typical HD ones ?
Might anyone recommend a brand and model number for wired-together AC powered smoke detectors that they have had good luck with.
New baby, so false tripping is a real concern.
Thanks, Bob
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Bob wrote:

I'd just look into combination type. I have flame/smoke sensor combo, smoke/gas combo throughout the house some with 10 year battery back up in addition to AC power and some has light as well as audible alarm..
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Hi Tony:
Thanks for info.
Guess you have been pleased with yours.
Brand and Model Number ?
Thanks, Bob ---------------
On 4/2/2014 6:34 PM, Tony Hwang wrote:

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*If you are prone to nuisance alarms from cooking or bathroom steam, I would suggest that you install the photoelectric type.
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I don't know what semi-pro means, but there are there are for sale those that can be wired together.

How about start with the make and model you have now. If it' snot for sale, call the manufacturer and ask what replaces it. I'm sure there's an 800 number on the unit.

Until he learns to walk, tripping shouldn't be a problem.

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On Wednesday, April 2, 2014 5:46:05 PM UTC-4, Bob wrote:

What you're asking for isn't a special feature, it is a code requirement.
That said, Gentex GN303 was typical go-to for hotel rooms etc. when I did s uch things. 7139 series if you need a strobe (for a bedroom used by someon e hearing impaired.) make one of them a 9123F if you want to tie into your security system as a fire point (that is compatible with the GN303 and wil l provide a Form C relay contact that will change state when any of your de tectors go into alarm.)
Also be aware that it used to be a requirement for detection only outside o f sleeping areas now it is inside and outside (plus at least one on every l evel of the house) so if you are trying to bring everything up to code you may want to consider adding detectors in the bedrooms.
I don't know if the Gentex smokes really are the best, but they seem to be very popular for commercial non-system smokes e.g. condos, hotel rooms, etc .
nate
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On Friday, April 4, 2014 1:59:47 PM UTC-4, N8N wrote:

one hearing impaired.) make one of them a 9123F if you want to tie into yo ur security system as a fire point (that is compatible with the GN303 and w ill provide a Form C relay contact that will change state when any of your detectors go into alarm.)

level of the house) so if you are trying to bring everything up to code yo u may want to consider adding detectors in the bedrooms.

tc.

Maybe you know the answer to something else. Is battery power also required today even if they are AC powered? Maybe it is in some places? Here, in NJ, new construction seems to be using onese that are both.
Personally, I would just use AC powered if allowed. The thing I can't understand is why with the AC powered ones that also have batteries, the batteries barely last a year. You would think that if they have AC, they would only use the batteries if they have to and they'd last a lot longer. Having to replace all those batteries is a PIA and I'd be perfectly fine with just AC powered ones. But I wonder if code where the OP is might require batteries in addition to AC now?
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On 4/4/2014 3:09 PM, trader_4 wrote:

The NEC has a note under 210.12 (AFCIs) "See NFPA ... 72-2010, National Fire Alarm and Signaling Code, for information related to secondary power supply requirements for smoke alarms installed in dwelling units."
"Secondary power" (battery) is required if circuits are powered by AFCIs. I presume those circuits are more likely to go dead early in a fire.
I have no idea how widely NFPA 72 is enforced. Or requirement could also be in local regulations.

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On Sunday, April 6, 2014 2:16:31 PM UTC-4, bud-- wrote:

Thanks for the info. Interesting. It's probably based more on guesses than any hard data. Personally, I'm OK with the level of protection of AC ones without the battery backup. But what really pisses me off is that the ones that were AC/battery that I've had the displeasure of being involved with, the batteries only last a year, just like a battery powered smoke detector. You would think it would use AC, with the battery there aa backup and it would be good for say 3 years.
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Do the batteries last a year or is that the recommended time to change them? Unused, batteries have a long shelf life, but once used only a short time gets the chemical reaction going and reduces the time.
As for AC only, that is great as long as you have power. Problem is, when power goes out, people will bring out the kerosene lamps, propane heaters, start the fireplace or woodstove. Without battery backup your detectors will be out of commission when needed the most.
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On Sunday, April 6, 2014 6:53:25 PM UTC-4, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

No, the time from putting in brand new ones to them giving a warning beep that the battery is going is about a year, sometimes less.

Yes, I agree that's one drawback. But I'd be willing to take that small gap in coverage. Especially since I don't have kerosene heaters propane heaters, etc. Even candles, which we used to use decades ago during power outages have largely been replaced by LED lanterns, etc. But you're right for many people that's when they do stupid things, during power outages and it's the main advantage to the battery type. On the other hand, I'd be willing to bet a lot more people have died from having just battery operated ones, where the batteries were dead, than there are people who had AC ones and the power was off when the fire struck.
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On 4/6/2014 7:21 PM, trader_4 wrote:

I have a couple of LED lanterns and highly recommend them. I also have a couple of plug in lights that will go on in the event of a power failure. Very handy.
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battery like many emergency lighting systems - powered by a AC/DC converter on a day-to-day basis, with a fail-over to the (big) battery.
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On Sunday, April 6, 2014 7:00:08 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I sure like that idea better than individual batteries in 10 of them.
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