cat5e and phone cable

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Thanks. I do not understand what's wrong with putting cat5e cables next to electrical conduits (we have metallic conduits), but the rest makes sense to me.
i
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Here's a tutorial that perhaps might explain some of the restrictions. If you tied your cables to electrical conduits for any significant length, it might still work but it could fail certification.
http://www.lanshack.com/cat5e-tutorial.asp
From a physics standpoint, what you are concerned with is electromagnetic shielding. A grounded conduit provides nearly 100% electrostatic shielding, but the currents in the electrical conductors within produce a dynamic magnetic field that leaves the boundary of the conduit and is almost impossible to shield or contain.
A few years ago, everyone was concerned about these low frequency magnetic fields but if was difficult to prove that they caused any health hazards.
They can and do interfere with communications circuits, though, and this is why there is a specific prohibition about attatching cat5 to conduit.
Beachcomber
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Beachcomber wrote:

I may be wrong but, I don't think that's right. That's why ethernet uses twisted pairs of wires -- so it can reject common mode interference. A voltage caused by a stray magnetic field would be equally induced on both conductors of the pair and would be rejected.
Bob
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It is common practice to terminate both an ethernet jack and phone line using one cat5 cable.

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On Wed, 08 Jun 2005 22:34:41 -0400, Unrevealed Source wrote:

Not in my house, it isn't.
--
If you're not on the edge, you're taking up too much space.
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Ignoramus23410 wrote:

You can use the center pair of wires (I'm not sure what the color code is) for telephone. That's why a RJ45 ethernet connector uses pins 1,2,3,6. 4 and 5 were reserved by the old "Starnet" (Xerox?) standard for telephone. You can plug an RJ11 telephone line into a RJ45 socket wired this way to get a telephone signal. I have one jack in my basement wired like that, but I generally run a seperate CAT3 cable for telephone.
Bob
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