Carpenter Bees HELP

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My shed is being eaten by bees. How do you stop them? They have eaten right through the paint. Is there something that you can add to the paint or anything else to stop them?
Thanks in advance
ChrisGW
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Gotta kill 'em. The best stuff I've found is TAT [check MAB or Sherwin-Williams].
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Chris, I just wait for them to fly in the hole, then put wood putty or silicone in the hole while they are in there. The buzz like hell for a while, then die. Silicone works the best, they sometimes drill back out through the wood putty :-). (Payback Time!)
Stretch
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Get a badmitton raquet - they are fun to hit - they can't see the strings with their eyes and ears. They also return to birth home like salmon - so they will be back unless you kill them.
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ChrisGW wrote:

They don't EAT the wood - they just DRILL it to lay their eggs.
Carpenter bees are harmless.
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@hotmail.com says... :) My shed is being eaten by bees. How do you stop them? They have eaten right :) through the paint. Is there something that you can add to the paint or anything :) else to stop them? :) :) Oil based paints is usually needed. For the existing holes any insecticide that you can get in the chambers should work. Do it at night so you know she is home.
--
Lar

to email....get rid of the BUGS
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Harmless? What do you think love to eat their eggs. Pileated woodpeckers. My fascia has been destroyed.

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says... :) :) > Oil based paints is usually needed. For the existing holes any :) > insecticide that you can get in the chambers should work. Do it at :) > night so you know she is home. :) :) "She"? It's a *chick*? Aw, bummer, dood. :) :) :) Yepper..it's female that you will find excavating the galleries...the kamikaze brigade that are buzzing about are males, with no stingers.
--
Lar

to email....get rid of the BUGS
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Right, except that the holes they open up expose the wood to the elements internally.
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"She"? It's a *chick*? Aw, bummer, dood.
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Like hell they're harmless - they damage wooden structures by drilling holes in them. Sometimes those holes go pretty deep. It can significantly weaken the wood.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
Nobody ever left footprints in the sands of time by sitting on his butt. And who wants to leave buttprints in the sands of time?
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wrote:

Fire, and lots of it!
Oh, sorry fire is my answer for everything, car troubles, bills, etc.
I've been told, there are a number of powers on the market. You squirt them into the holes, and the power attaches it self to teh bees and kill them. With time, the bees already there, and the ones trying to get in will drop down. This will allow you to reseal all the holes and paint again.
In the future, keep an eye on the shed, as soon as you see one whole you squirt it.
I've once heard this advice, make a fake whole and keep it filled with the powder. New incoming bees will check it out, and kill themselves. This way your shed is protected.
hth,
tom

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right
anything
We had them in our fence at old house. I used my old two-cycle weed trimmer on them. The gas was mixed with a little too much oil so it smoked pretty good. The smoke seemed to draw the bees out of the fence and shrubs they liked and I'd get the trimmer going pretty good and take them on. There was something quite satisfying about hearing one of them smack into the house or fence.
I know, it wasn't the safest way to get them, but it was more fun just spaying insecticide on them.
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Goedjn wrote:

Carpenter bees aren't particularly useful as pollinators and definitely destructive of structures. I'll agree as a general proposition, but eliminating them from structural members is about the only successful approach I've found--simply plugging existing holes, etc., has ime, only caused them to move and start over again. Eliminating a particular nesting colony, otoh, has tended to have better success as it's easier to stop a new small colonization as opposed to an established one.
IMO, YMMV, $0.02, etc., ...
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I discommend killing them. These days, the world needs all the pollinators it can get. Try an epoxy/enamel type paint that isn't designed to chalk. (boat paint, maybe?)
--Goedjn
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Gary and Karla wrote:

Go ahead, blame the victim.
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I have to agree, but not these bees. I would be so happy to have mason bees verses these 'hoving monsters'. The are very teritorial, and just walking around my yard, usually means I have to duck way to many times.
tom

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wrote:
snip snip......... I have problems with carpenter bees ..have for the last 5-6 years...
Problems with two outbuildings... a Wood shop and a Garage...NOT the house... and only on the trim on those buildings
For some reason...the bees only do thier thing on wood that was painted a dark color in my case... Brown The house has white trim
So 2 years ago when I painted the woodshop I changed the trim to white...(not because of the bee problem ) BUT the bees just stopped attaching the building .. .end of the bee problem ....
Have no idea why..But the garage is getting painted this year and you bet the trim will be change to white...
Not a Scientific observation..But what can I say.....
Bob Griffiths
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Try Pale blue. No bee is going to plant eggs in the sky.
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The trim is white. They do not care. They also drilled holes through the silicone. They are tough. I like to watch them, but they cause to much damage.
Chris
Bob G. wrote:

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