Can I decrease the heat loss?

Page 2 of 2  

On Thu, 4 Feb 2010 11:20:19 -0800, "Bill"

Washing by machine with a full load uses less water than hand washing. Proven fact many times over.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Any cites on the web?
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Terry says he shut off his water heater in a 60F basement and went away for a 2 week vacation and upon returning the water was STILL TEPID. Clearly water just sitting in a water heater tank cools off very slowly. So, how drastic of a savings do you really think you're going to get by putting the water heater on a timer? You don't save anything until the water cools off enough where it would have come on anyway. From that point on, you do save, because the heat loss will now be less than it would have been if the temp were higher. But given that it cools very slowly, in practice you are going to save very little, if anything.
Also, for many people, putting the water heater on a timer would be a losing proposition and take a very long time to break even. For example, if you can't do the work yourself and have to call an electrician, it ain't gonna be cheap.
I'm going to do the experiment here with my water heater and measure the water temp at night before shutting it off and again in the morning. My prediction: It isn't going to drop very much at all.

I saw some DOE data a while back that showed solar heating of water in the final analysis wasn't significantly cheaper than other simpler choices like storage water heaters.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Add more insulation, insulate the HW pipe with black foam slip on insulation, some brands have a glue strip for complete seal, add thermal unions or couplings at the water heater. Alot of heat is wasted to the pipes. Turn down the temp of the heater.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Umpteen years ago, I did install a timer, on my electric water heater. I'm not sure it did a lot of difference, but I felt like I was "doing something". Electric heat is expensive. It had two on cycles which I set for AM and evening about bath time.
If you do sit down baths. I've taken to leaving the water in the tub until the water is cold. Supplies some humidity to my home, and releases the BTU which I paid for. My tub and washing machine are near by. I've been known to feed the washing machine with bath tub water for the wash cycle.
--
Christopher A. Young
Learn more about Jesus
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
C & E wrote the following:

Put your hand on the heater case. Is the outside hot? If so, then you need extra insulation. If it is room temperature, you don't. I have a 4 year old, 40 gal. GE propane heater. The outside is 72 F
--

Bill
In Hamptonburgh, NY
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

the best way to save money on hot water is to turn the temperature setting down. Turn it down to the point where you need to use almost full hot to take a shower. Also if you have a mixing valve, close it. Mark
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Not so quick. Last week I know of a person that died from Legionellae (he had other complications) and his girlfriend was also infected. They suspect it was from the water heater. He was a cheap sort of guy and did turn down the temperature. do NOT go below 130 degrees.
http://www.treehugger.com/files/2009/03/turning-down-water-heater-safe.php
* 70 to 80 C (158 to 176 F): Disinfection range * At 66 C (151 F): Legionellae die within 2 minutes * At 60 C (140 F): Legionellae die within 32 minutes * At 55 C (131 F): Legionellae die within 5 to 6 hours * Above 50 C (122 F): They can survive but do not multiply * 35 to 46 C (95 to 115 F): Ideal growth range * 20 to 50 C (68 to 122 F): Legionellae growth range * Below 20 C (68 F): Legionellae can survive but are dormant
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.